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Short answer: There is no difference. Long answer: Come, ride with me through the veins of history. I'll show you a god who falls asleep on the job. (And how can we win, when fools can be kings? Don't waste your time or time will waste you.) The word 'company' (as in a corporation) is derived from the word 'company' (as in a group of people, like the ...


7

The criminal complaint against Sarao can be found on the US Department of Justice's website. He was charged under four different sections of US Code: 18 USC 1343, which prohibits the use of inter-state or foreign telecommunications in the furtherance of a fraudulent scheme. 18 USC 1348, which prohibits fraud concerning securities and commodities markets. ...


7

I imagine it's not a crime to change your mind before the order goes through, but that's not really what this guy did. The allegation is instead that he never intended to follow through on those orders in the first place. Entering an order to sell stocks and then canceling those orders is a crime if its done with an intent to manipulate the market, which is ...


6

It depends How good is your (legal) English? For example, do you know the legal difference between "will", "shall" and "must"? Or, the difference between "employee", "subcontractor" and "worker"? Or the difference between "bankruptcy", "insolvency" and an "act of bankruptcy"? Contingency What are you going to put in your dispute resolution clause? Do you ...


4

I assume you're talking about corporations, not LLCs ("limited liability companies"). LLCs aren't corporations and don't issue shares of stock, and in any event Facebook is a corporation. Information relating to the shares of a corporation is typically outlined in the articles of incorporation, but practices and governing law varies by state and by ...


3

Possibly Your employment contract is only one part of your deal You are also bound by the company’s constitution and any shareholder agreement that may exist. Companies often have wide ranging powers to repurchase their own shares at fair market value or following a pre-specified formula. It’s not uncommon for private companies to get an option to purchase ...


2

Class A and Class B are categories of common stock (also known as ordinary shares). Common stock/ordinary shares are what most investors purchase when they’re investing in the stock market. The only difference between Class A and Class B is the voting power one receives along with the share. A company that issues multiple levels of stock usually does so to ...


2

Is the company allowed to take ownership of my shares without paying for all of it at once? Yes. Just like the company can take ownership of anything they buy on credit. As a creditor, you would rank ahead of shareholders in any insolvency proceedings but while first shot at nothing is better than second shot at nothing you still end up with nothing. I'...


2

The company is the company. It has its own legal personality. (That's why it "possesses all powers of a natural person, subject to any restrictions in the Corporations Act.") The company makes decisions and takes actions according to its constitution. Speaking of companies generally, some decisions are made by the shareholders, according to some voting ...


2

Does company have the right to purchase my vested shares after I quit? No. Although either party may terminate the employment relation, the notion of termination for cause typically denotes the employer's conclusion that the employee incurred some wrongdoing or misconduct. Some results from this search reproduce excerpts of contracts defining the notion of "...


1

Given the statutory reference in the question, I assume that this question is about U.S. income tax laws. When you contribute property (money or in kind) to a corporation and receive initially offered or treasury shares in exchange from the corporation, under U.S. tax law, the transaction is a non-taxable contribution to capital. In the case of a cash ...


1

Companys limited by shares1 always have shareholders When you apply to create a company it is created with the number and types of shares specified and are owned by the people nominated in the application form. Tax Shares in a newly founded company can be set at any value and their acquisition does not create a taxable event for either the founder(s) or ...


1

How would I go about (in these negotiating times) to avoid such a scenario? You can't, although a well-thought contract reduces the chances of loss. Even if you hire an expensive attorney and sue the buyer or company, you still are at risk of losing everything because there are many incompetent lawyers and many corrupt judges. The judge presiding your case ...


1

It is important to only enter into this partnership with someone you trust but you and the investor will have different incentive structures and may very well have different views of the company as time goes on. The investor does not need to be a dishonest person to decide that you might need to be demoted from CEO at some point, for example. You may differ ...


1

Because he wanted to Why he wanted to only he and whoever he's told knows. An out of court settlement is simply a deal that comes at the end of a negotiation - possibly a long and arduous negotiation. People make deals based on what they think is in their own best interests. This may not be going to court for many years, funding that litigation for an ...


1

However you like; subject to the law Your constitution can deal with any matters that take your fancy and can require whatever majority you like in order to make changes to some or all of it up to and including unanimity.


1

Even if you're good in English and very knowledgeable about legal jargon, you should not write your own contract. To write a good contract, you must know the law, not just the jargon. The person writing the contract should be familiar with the findings of the courts in the relevant jurisdictions. Perhaps someone lost an important case because a contract ...


1

The Company is the Company Companies have their own legal personhood and they are responsible for their actions. Obviously, a company has no physical existence so it can’t act on its own - it must act through its agents, acting within their actual or ostensible authority. Actual authority means the person(s) actually have the power under the law and the ...


1

Not in australia Changes in shareholding of private companies require the approval of all existing shareholders. However, in general (for private and public companies), shares are issued for something of value to the company - cash or something else - and therefore of value to the existing shareholders. The directors (and shareholders in private companies) ...


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