47

Can I sign legal documents with a smiley face? Yes, that is lawful. A person's signature does not necessarily have to include the person's name or initials. What matters is that the signature reliably and unequivocally identifies the person who produces it, which apparently you have been able to prove by showing your driver's license. The Black's Law ...


33

No, Specific Ink Colors are not Required That is not correct. If the purple will not photocopy well, the other party might reasonably ask for a color that will. But a signature is normally only evidence of agreement to the provisions, and it is the agreement that is legally important. The color of the ink used does not change the agreement. It is normal to ...


16

My best advice: purple ink is fine, unless they object, then find a color you both agree to. Everything past this point assumes an adverse relationship. Think about the dismal shape of things. A contract is a meeting of the minds. A contract-breaking dispute has arisen over the color of ink on the contract. Anti-purple is saying the contract is not ...


8

someone told me that writing in purple is not valid on legal documents. This is likely a misconception since most forms say use blue or black ink, but there is no law regulating a valid signature. In the US you can sign with an "X", a fingerprint, a yellow crayon if so inclined, a wax stamp, pencil, or even invisible ink* as long as it is meant to show ...


8

You would be amazed at how vanishingly few the number of cases are where a signature is disputed. Signatures are easy, quick and don't require you having inky fingers all the time. They are so useful that to throw them out to deal with infinintesimally small fractions of disputes over their veracity (bearing in mind that 99.999999999% of contracts never ...


7

The primary question, in case of such a lawsuit, is whether you accepted the terms of the contract. You could accept the terms verbally, or you could accept them with a signature, or you could even accept by behavior (such as showing up to work). If you breach the contract and you want to make the argument that you didn't accept the offer (or some ...


6

Fingerprinting as a reliable and widely acknowledged means of identification only dates to about 1879 CE. Signatures have been in wide use for many, many centuries and were preceded by the use of official seals (a practice still in use in Japan). So, the use of signatures was deeply entrenched in the legal system long before fingerprinting existed, and ...


4

In contrast to the US, where I live in Europe only the written surname (first name optional) is considered a valid signature (in most cases). Some documents, like a Last Will, even need to be signed with your full name, including middle name(s). It is possible though to use any sign as your legal signature if the sign is registered and affirmed by a notary. ...


3

"Acknowledged" is fine. There is no "preferable" substitute with which to prefix your signature. As a precaution, never leave too much space between the end of clauses and your signature, lest another clause later on gets slid in without your consent (a public institution is unlikely to incur such misconduct, though). Also, always be sure to ask for a copy ...


3

Those two situations should be legally equivalent. The key thing is that you intend to agree to the contract, and are taking physical steps that are intended to manifest your agreement. If you had added an electronic signature to the PDF file, and transmitted this to the company, it should also be legally equivalent, and just as binding as the pen and ...


2

Does the person who is given permission to sign as the "Authorized Signature" (at the bottom of the bank check) have to sign exactly as the real Authorized Signer or just use one's own style to sign as the Authorized Signature? The bigger question is whether a signature on a check made with the permission of someone who is allowed by the bank to sign ...


2

The historical and cultural context described by @ohwilleke is really the major reason why signatures are widely used to endorse documents, and fingerprints are not. However the question assumes that signatures cannot be verified with reliability. See https://www.crimemuseum.org/crime-library/forensic-investigation/handwriting-analysis/ and https://www....


2

A contract is a meeting of the minds. If your conduct before and immediately after the signing resembles the way people act when they have a meeting of the minds, that is proof of agreement. To invalidate a contract over a defective signature, a party would have to object timely to the signature; immediately or the first time they reasonably should have ...


2

... are there any concrete rules which would render this document invalid? Yes It would be invalid if: it was a forgery, the consent it represents was obtained via undue influence. The onus of proving either would be on the person challenging the validity of the document. This would normally be the executor of the estate which obviously poses conflict of ...


2

I've noticed that in preparation for closing on a house, a title search is done. What is the name of the document that is produced when the title search is complete? There are several kinds of products of a title search that could be produced. The smallest and cheapest, but not usually sufficient for a closing on real estate, is an O&E for "...


1

spain Yes, if the PDF is signed cryptographically and / or the source authenticity of an electronic or printed version of it can else wise be verified. In other words, scanned pen signature is useless (as in value less authenticity wise), but easy to automate, so a nice and elegant complement for a document deemed authentic by whatever other reason. If ...


1

Whereas the precise legality if this depends on the rules/laws of the body receiving the documents and what they are about, there are some generally applicable considerations as follows. The whole idea and common practice of accepting digital scans of paper documents for legal purposes without seeing/receiving the papers themselves is very susceptible to ...


1

The point of a signature is traditionally to demonstrate that a particular person has knowingly and deliberately agreed to a particular set of terms. In both traditional and digital media, this doesn't have to take any specific form - a simple cross or X has been more than sufficient, even if it has no relationship to the name of the signatory - as long as ...


1

Contracts, as a general rule, don`t even have to be written to be valid. But, some have to be because a law very often exists requiring this. The color ink used is normally irrelevant to its validity, unless the contract states otherwise or a statute (law). Courts usually have local rules requiring signatures on all documents be in either blue or black ink, ...


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