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6

Such a lawsuit would be unsuccessful in the United States, given the numerous barriers imposed by the First Amendment. First, a plaintiff can only win a defamation case if it proves that the defamatory statement was false. If a statement cannot be proven false, it is legally considered a statement of opinion, which is protected by the First Amendment. ...


4

Calling someone an "asshole" is, at least in the US, an expression of opinion and so is not defamation. Saying that someone has committed a crime may be defamation, but not if that person has in fact already been convicted of that crime. In general if a statement is provably true, it is not defamation. If all that this hypothetical firms does is to post ...


2

Generally, no A limited purpose public figure must have "thrust themselves to the forefront of particular public controversies in order to influence the resolution of the issues involved" to be a public figure. Merely being a CEO doesn’t do this. Being a CEO at the heart of controversy like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg or Volkswagen’s Martin Winterkorn does.


2

Truthfully telling another person that you are suing, or planning to sue, your former landlord is not defamation. Truthfully reporting what you yourself hav observed is not defamation either. In general, making truthful statements of fact, or clear statements of opinion is not defamation. However, when you make speculative statements about thinks you do not ...


2

When does it help getting more people on "your side" when taking a claim to court? When relevant testimony given by credible witnesses reinforces your claims and/or serves to reflect your adversary's pattern of conduct in similar situations. If I did try something like this, could it count against me as defamation? Generally speaking, no. The mere ...


2

What are the legal implications of all of this? Person B has a viable claim of defamation for statements falsely attributed to him. If the false representations are severe by falsely attributing to him felonies or moral turpitude, it is defamation per se and therefore person B is not required to prove damages. In order to be awarded more than nominal ...


1

If defamatory misinformation were put on a sex offender registry, there is little chance that the defamed person can sue for damages. These registries are government operations, and the doctrine of sovereign immunity prevents the government from being sued, unless they explicitly give permission to be sued over some wrong. There are 50 states and the federal ...


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