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139

You say: the school expects him to create a public Twitter account, with his real information, in order to promote the program & the results of the program. This is a cut-and-dried case of compelled speech. Your son is being required to say certain things in public in order to pass this course. The Supreme Court has decided that students do not "...


48

I think some of the answers are good but taking a long approach. Much easier approach: Student: "I can't do the assignment." Teacher: "Why?" Student: "Twitter won't let me sign-up" Teacher: "Why?" Student: "I don't agree to their Terms of Service" Teacher: "You have to agree to it to use the site and will need to do that to pass" Student: "Will ...


29

I would suggest reaching out to the ACLU in addition to the EFF on the matter as the school could be in violation of multiple constitutional rights by compelling the student's participation on Twitter. There are two notable First Amendment violations, the first in the government compelling speech in the public forum with his personal information available (...


10

Is this illegal? No, subject to some possible narrow exceptions discussed below. Do the social media companies have a duty under the First Amendment to not censor users? No. Indeed, usually, there is greater liability exposure for failing to censor content, for example, by failing to honor a "take down notice" under Title II of the Digital ...


8

This will be a very likely legal victory, but a potentially hard legal path. This is wrong for a bunch of factors. The downside is there's a lot of interesting legal exploration to do here, and some "new law" has a chance to emerge (i.e. influential case law), and it would take years to litigate it all. The good news is, you only have to win on one arm of ...


6

GDPR compliance is a matter between every customer and the business, not between different customers. How did you get the other customer's contact details? If they were provided or leaked by the business, that might be a failure of the business's obligation as a data controller to protect the personal data they are processing, possibly even a data breach in ...


5

I have personal experience dealing with something similar. What I found was that the school district has policies, which are usually drafted from a boiler plate (which often originates from a subscription service) and then perhaps tweaked before being adopted by the Board of Education. There is generally an IT consent form (e.g. “Student Acceptable Use ...


4

A school district can have a policy requiring students to sign up for computer accounts of some ilk. There is no constitutional right to be free of Twitter. Schools have broad latitude to require students to do things that some parents do not like, in aid of some stated educational goal. Generally, your recourse is political (lobby against the program, vote ...


3

You can be fired in Canada for criticizing the employer, or even complaining about the weather. There is a distinction between Termination Without Cause and Termination With Cause. In the latter case, which requires a serious reason related to the employee's conduct, you can be fired without advance notice and with no severance pay. If the employees actions ...


3

Yes. Content not created by a user is not protected by Section 230, and if the platform agents or employees begin to substantively edit content, the platform becomes a co-author rather than merely a platform for that content.


2

A fake post in the sense of one that appears to be a Twitter or Facebook post (or a post on some other well-known social media site) but is in fact nothing of the sort, might be an infringement of trademark rights. Presumably such amn imitation would display the logo and other trademarks of the site being imitated, without permission, and in a way likely to ...


1

Generally, a short quote from a published poem would constitute fair use (if in the US) or fair dealing (if in the UK or much of the EU). so would a parody or other altered version of a short quote. In any case, even if his is beyond fair use/fair dealing, any copyright issue could only be enforced by the copyright holder filing an infringement suit against ...


1

The answer is either "yes they can" or "no they can't", depending on the specifics of the school. The teacher answers to school policy, so if there is a policy forbidding such an requirement, then they can't, otherwise they can. Whether or not there is such a school policy depends in turn on specifics regarding the school, primarily (a) whether the policy-...


1

Under California law (Cal. Civ. §46), Slander is a false and unprivileged publication, orally uttered, and also communications by radio or any mechanical or other means which...4. Imputes to him impotence or a want of chastity You could hire an attorney to file a defamation lawsuit against the party. As part of the process, your attorney would file ...


1

It first depends on whether the author has granted permission to others to use, copy, reproduce, process, adapt, modify, publish, transmit, display and distribute such Content in any and all media or distribution methods (now known or later developed). Hosting sites often include such licensing as a condition of using their service. Such a license eliminates ...


1

To be very clear, you can still be sued in civil court for what someone has posted on you platform; basically, anyone can sue anyone for virtually anything in civil court, and if sued, you will have to answer the lawsuit with the help of an attorney. But you can use The Communications Decency Act as a defense, and most likely prevail, in looking at many past ...


1

Under 47 U.S.C. § 230, a Provision of the Communication Decency Act, social media providers are not responsible for the content posted on their platforms. "No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider"


1

Yes In theory at least. Libel attaches to any publisher of the libellous statement and anyone who publishes an endorsement of that statement. So, for example, a person who retweets a libellous statement liable and there is case law to support this. Of course, if you republish without endorsement (e.g. "Look at the BS X said: ...") then you are not liable. ...


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