6

This is a case of nominative use. In general, it is fine to use trademarks to refer to the products trademarked, provided that a reasonable person would not be confused about who creates or provides the product, and would not think that the trademark holder has endorsed, authorized, or sponsored the book or other product that refers to the trademark. It is ...


5

There are several possibilities The effects are not the same Minecraft has them under a different licence from the owner Minecraft is committing copyright violation And the most likely: they belong to Minecraft and someone has illegally uploaded them to the site


4

If it was something important to the owner, they would file injunctions/suits against everybody that they find the code in, and make those very public. This isn't unlike what the RIAA did to individual downloaders of pirated music files, filing over 18,000 lawsuits. They could subpoena GitHub for information related to IP addresses for who downloaded the ...


4

Why would the method by which you transfer a item that has a copyright impact the copyright? You buy a new book at a new bookstore, a used book at a used bookstore, a used book at a garage sale, someone gives you a book, you find a book on the sidewalk, you steal a book from a store, you buy and download an ebook, you give an ebook to someone on a USB stick, ...


3

I wrote a letter to the Eclipse Foundation. The consultant pointed me to section 5 in their FAQ. My case falls under the term "linking". He warned that he isn't a lawyer, but offered the following short answer: The Eclipse Foundation does not consider linking with EPL content to be a derivative work and so you are not required to disclose your source code....


3

Any processing of personal data needs a legal basis, for example necessity for some contract or legitimate interest. If no other legal basis allows the processing, you need to acquire consent. Consent must be freely given. If something is gated behind consent without that consent being really necessary, this might coerce users and they would not be able to ...


2

If the company does not pay the agreed sums, they have materially breached the contract. The contractor is probably allowed to rescind the contract and withhold things due under it, including both further work (if any remains) and the software. The contractor would have to notify the company of an intention to rescind. The contractor would need to give ...


2

No As a 16 year old you do not need a Child Work Permit - these are required for "[a] minor under 16 years of age". Notwithstanding, minor's contracts can be classified as valid, voidable or void. There are two types of valid contracts: Contracts for "necessaries", and Employment, apprenticeship and training contracts. Your employment contract is binding ...


2

The answer by Paul Johnson is quite correct. A good practice would be to use the reviewer's description of the problem, and of the needed solution, but without referring to the reviewer's code example (or referring to it as little as possible), derive new code to solve the issue. If the developer uses the reviewer's code in creating the solution, and ther ...


2

If you use the reviewer's code, or code derived from it (e.g. if you just changed a variable name) then they own the copyright on that part of the software. If the reviewer describes a solution which you implement, or if you re-implement the code from scratch while taking ideas and methods from the reviewer's code, then you own the copyright on that code. ...


2

Your lawyers should understand that you're dealing with a private company that can make and enforce its own policies when it comes to allowing access to the their store. If Google's policy is to require you to do research and diligence on a possible trademark infringement of your App, that's legal, as long as Google's requirements don't not violate local or ...


1

united-states To make such a web application work, it would need (in the US) to use the "safe harbor" provisions of the DMCA (17 USC 512(c)). (If not in the US, it would need to make use if the comparable law in that country. Most nations now have more or less comparable laws, because the modified Berne Copyright treaty required some implementing law.) ...


1

That will depend on the language of the agreement which establishes the account. This will be a contract between the customer and Origin. If it prohibits transferring an account or sharing an account between multiple people, such provisions would be valid. It wouldn't be a criminal offense, but it might well be a breach of contract allowing Origin to cancel ...


1

No, a breach by one party does not relieve the other party of their obligations If the contractor is contractually obliged to hand over the IP then they have to do so or breach the contract. The fact that the other party may (or may not) be in breach doesn't change that. The remedy for a breach of contract is damages, not a relief of obligations. ...


1

A trademark identifies goods and services belonging to the trademark’s owner. Using them to do that is what they are for.


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