7

Can anybody create their own license? That is to say, can I for example create my own license under which I can license software? Yep. It's just a contract granting rights to use a copyrighted work. You can write your own contracts, so you can write your own software license. It's just often recommended that you don't, because common licenses are more ...


4

Art. 17 GDPR, Right to erasure (‘right to be forgotten’) requires “erasure of personal data concerning him or her”. That’s all personal data. However, this only applies when this article applies. Section 1 details when this is and sections 2 and 3 detail limitations and exceptions to the right of erasure. For example, you would be allowed to keep financial ...


3

Return it If you are unwilling to enter the contract then you can return the device for a refund.


3

The primary legal division is that you can lawfully talk about intellectual property (such talking becomes your intellectual property), and you can only redistribute intellectual property with the permission of the owner. (A contractual non-disclosure agreement is irrelevant, because you aren't an Apple employee obligae=ted to not talk about the new system ...


3

That a computer language is proprietary does not mean that all code written in that language is copyrighted by the holder of copyright on the language. Anyone may write, and publish, code in a particular language without permission from the language designers, or anyone else, provided that the code is original and is not a close paraphrase of code written by ...


2

Yes, everybody can write licenses. No, not everybody should. Ask a lawyer that is a specialist in this or use an already established license. Using this software you agree that any work and intellectual property based on or created with this software will be under the [INSERT_NAME_LICENSE] license, even after any and all code from this software is removed ...


2

here is what the law says about the mobile apps alternative to homepage 1798.140.p (p) “Homepage” means the introductory page of an internet website and any internet web page where personal information is collected. In the case of an online service, such as a mobile application, homepage means the application’s platform page or download page, a link within ...


2

A user's rights to intellectual property can be bargained away to various extents. In general, a user either has a right to IP because they created the IP, or because they acquired a right via a license and in exchange for consideration (e.g. a license to use MS Word, in exchange for money). Your app grants permission to use your IP (in exchange for ...


2

A business is free to set its pricing model in whatever way it chooses, unless there is a specific law restring this. As no country or jurisdiction is mentioned in the question, there is no way to judge if some specific law applies. (In the US that would probably be a matter of state law.) A business could set its prices at 10 per user, but with a Minimum ...


2

You're getting a "contradiction" because you're assuming the only transaction occurring is when you purchase the Apple computer. But, there are two separate transactions, or, in contract terms, two separate "bargained-for exchanges." The first is when you purchase and receive the computer, and the second is when you receive the right to ...


2

You are absolutely allowed to discuss or describe or criticizes software (or books or other copyrighted or trademarked things) without any permission from the copyright holder or trademark holder. This includes teaching people how to use those things. You may not, however, copy protected software without permission. For example you could not include a CD ...


1

First of all, it is possible that the software is in fact legal. Copies of older versions bought in bulk for resale but never sold are sometimes sold at large discounts because no one will buy them at more normal prices. And there are other scenarios (such as OEM licenses) under which these might be legal. In that case, there is no problem for anyone. If ...


1

I actually did this, some years ago. I was working full-time as a software developer, and had created and published as shareware some file manipulation utilities, not related to the primary business of my then employer. Then a situation arose where the functions of those utilities would be useful to the employer. Since the employer was a sole proprietor, not ...


1

First it must be established that this is not a work for hire. Since the guy is hired to write code for the company, this is non-trivial, but doable. Since the company has no claim to owning the copyright, the employee can treat his employer just like he would treat any other customer: he would license the use of the code, while retaining copyright. Then it ...


1

If your work is advertising your filter, and if the use of the names or logos might reasonably cause potential consumers to think your product was authorized or endorsed by the makers of any of those other products, thus would clearly constitute trademark infringement under US law. Even if there is no suggestion of endorsement, if the video is advertising ...


1

Libsodium is hosted in France, and the lead developer appears to be French. That means the project can completely ignore US-based export restrictions. OpenSSL, on the other hand, is based in the US and so is subject to those restrictions.


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