4

It depends on what you are selling to the enterprises. You could be selling just a licence to use the program, and retain all the rights on the source code. You could be selling the rights to the source code. For #1, the source code is yours and you can do what it pleases with it1. In fact many programs offer both an open-source licence (which usually ...


3

You can read it, you can examine it to the point where you understand it, and then you can get inspired by the code and write your own code, without copying the code on the website, which does the same thing. If there is no license, then you can do what copyright law allows you to do. You are not allowed to copy the code, or create derived works by taking ...


3

The general rule is that the author of the software owns the copyright, so that would be the student. This is regardless of whether the student writes the code for fun, or for a thesis. If a student is hired to write that code, then it kind of depends on the university rules, and who hires the student. In the case of a "work for hire", the employer owns the ...


2

If running Linux on same physical computer as Windows, can one legally use Microsoft's files? Apparently not. The fonts would be considered a feature of the software. Even mounting the Windows file system in your Linux partition, as opposed to copying the fonts, would violate the terms of the license. That is because the terms of the license allow the ...


1

I think in the example you mention, the aggregator is the controller because it "determines the purposes and means of the processing of personal data", see Art. 4(7). Typically the aggregator would be a joint controller with the user, however the user probably uses this for purely personal reasons only, so the GDPR does not apply to the user. That would ...


1

No, you cannot do that based just on the EULA. You need to talk to the product owners and make a deal. The Product may be incorporated into, and may incorporate itself, into software and other technology owned or controlled by third parties. Although the EULA mentions third parties, it is focused on what end users (the "second" parties) can do with the ...


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