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1

united-states To make such a web application work, it would need (in the US) to use the "safe harbor" provisions of the DMCA (17 USC 512(c)). (If not in the US, it would need to make use if the comparable law in that country. Most nations now have more or less comparable laws, because the modified Berne Copyright treaty required some implementing law.) ...


2

Your lawyers should understand that you're dealing with a private company that can make and enforce its own policies when it comes to allowing access to the their store. If Google's policy is to require you to do research and diligence on a possible trademark infringement of your App, that's legal, as long as Google's requirements don't not violate local or ...


1

No, a breach by one party does not relieve the other party of their obligations If the contractor is contractually obliged to hand over the IP then they have to do so or breach the contract. The fact that the other party may (or may not) be in breach doesn't change that. The remedy for a breach of contract is damages, not a relief of obligations. ...


1

That will depend on the language of the agreement which establishes the account. This will be a contract between the customer and Origin. If it prohibits transferring an account or sharing an account between multiple people, such provisions would be valid. It wouldn't be a criminal offense, but it might well be a breach of contract allowing Origin to cancel ...


2

If the company does not pay the agreed sums, they have materially breached the contract. The contractor is probably allowed to rescind the contract and withhold things due under it, including both further work (if any remains) and the software. The contractor would have to notify the company of an intention to rescind. The contractor would need to give ...


2

No As a 16 year old you do not need a Child Work Permit - these are required for "[a] minor under 16 years of age". Notwithstanding, minor's contracts can be classified as valid, voidable or void. There are two types of valid contracts: Contracts for "necessaries", and Employment, apprenticeship and training contracts. Your employment contract is binding ...


0

Legally, everyone downloading the software would be committing copyright infringement. You could sue the uploader for statutory damages (maximum $150,000) or actual damages; people who have worked years to collect some wealth usually don’t do that kind of nonsense, so you might win a judgement but most likely won’t collect any damages because there is no ...


4

If it was something important to the owner, they would file injunctions/suits against everybody that they find the code in, and make those very public. This isn't unlike what the RIAA did to individual downloaders of pirated music files, filing over 18,000 lawsuits. They could subpoena GitHub for information related to IP addresses for who downloaded the ...


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When a person creates a new work that is a derivative of an existing copyrighted work, the author of the new work gets a copyright on its original content (not on content copied from the base work). However, creating a derivative work is one of the protected rights of copyright (in US law, this is in 17 USC 106), so the author of the new work must have ...


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There are several possibilities The effects are not the same Minecraft has them under a different licence from the owner Minecraft is committing copyright violation And the most likely: they belong to Minecraft and someone has illegally uploaded them to the site


3

I wrote a letter to the Eclipse Foundation. The consultant pointed me to section 5 in their FAQ. My case falls under the term "linking". He warned that he isn't a lawyer, but offered the following short answer: The Eclipse Foundation does not consider linking with EPL content to be a derivative work and so you are not required to disclose your source code....


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