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1

I think in the example you mention, the aggregator is the controller because it "determines the purposes and means of the processing of personal data", see Art. 4(7). Typically the aggregator would be a joint controller with the user, however the user probably uses this for purely personal reasons only, so the GDPR does not apply to the user. That would ...


0

Users of the social network authorize the aggregator to access, store and display their friends' activity, and the service then notifies them when something interesting happens. This would make the aggregator (more precisely, the entity behind it) a "data controller" under the GDPR, right?. Not quite. What happens here is that you process the friends' data ...


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You can read it, you can examine it to the point where you understand it, and then you can get inspired by the code and write your own code, without copying the code on the website, which does the same thing. If there is no license, then you can do what copyright law allows you to do. You are not allowed to copy the code, or create derived works by taking ...


4

It depends on what you are selling to the enterprises. You could be selling just a licence to use the program, and retain all the rights on the source code. You could be selling the rights to the source code. For #1, the source code is yours and you can do what it pleases with it1. In fact many programs offer both an open-source licence (which usually ...


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No, you cannot do that based just on the EULA. You need to talk to the product owners and make a deal. The Product may be incorporated into, and may incorporate itself, into software and other technology owned or controlled by third parties. Although the EULA mentions third parties, it is focused on what end users (the "second" parties) can do with the ...


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If running Linux on same physical computer as Windows, can one legally use Microsoft's files? Apparently not. The fonts would be considered a feature of the software. Even mounting the Windows file system in your Linux partition, as opposed to copying the fonts, would violate the terms of the license. That is because the terms of the license allow the ...


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Software licenses, like most text documents, are protected by copyright. You don't have a right to just copy someone else's software license. You have even less rights to create a derived work by modifying someone else's software license (and in practice you would have to do that, even if only to change company and product names). The creators of the GPL ...


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Contrary to the other answers, Googles Terms of Use state: Don’t misuse our Services. For example, don’t interfere with our Services or try to access them using a method other than the interface and the instructions that we provide. https://policies.google.com/terms?hl=en Google withdrew the Flights API in April 2018, leaving the website as the only ...


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