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0

The likely issue here is that the link might be interpreted as an endorsement of your product by a user of your product. That is an easy assumption to make; after all they do use your product. The problem is that they might have made that decision in the past, and no longer endorse your current product.


3

I know of an app that did similar. They sold membership access and linked Youtube videos. One of the Youtuber's started to take legal action against them. I don't know what happened but the app blocked their content from being shown. Updated this comment to remove incorrect information. After looking at Youtube's recent terms and conditions; you aren't ...


-5

If you develop a device that may undermine, let's say, a company on a particular fragment of a certain field you will either be sued in case you put it on the market, or you'll be likely be damaged physically (i.e get rid out of) from a person related to that company (this stuff happens more often than you might think). I don't know the exact legal and ...


2

Many jurisdictions have a legal framework summarised with "everything that is not forbidden is allowed". And as far as I know the closest legislation and regulation regarding AI usage that can be found in some jurisdictions is that surrounding the "simple" limited scope subject of autonomous driving, but that might be different in yours. In that regard ...


2

Almost certainly not. My "almost" is because it is theoretically possible that your jurisdiction has a law which outlaws the development of AI. To check for that, see if any of the universities in your jurisdiction have AI groups in the Computer Science department. If they do, you can be pretty confident that it is legal. (Aside: the chances of a lone ...


0

Yes Commercial usage with respect to licensing is extremely broad - if you make money from it its commercial. It doesn’t matter if you make money directly, as in your usage case, or indirectly. For example, if you split your product and the paid version did not use the licences code at all, you still can’t advertise the paid version in the free version - ...


1

In Canada, you would have to satisfy the requirements of software as medical device. As a diagnostic device, it would be subject to regulation. Here is the law: you need to understand and comply with that. §10 requires you to take reasonable measures to (a) identify the risks inherent in the device;(b) if the risks can be eliminated, eliminate them; (c) ...


2

"Say the Debian Project were to distribute jshint". That's distribution, not use. The distinction matters. This line is appended to the MIT license, which starts by enumerating different rights including both "use" and "distribute". Hence it's reasonable to assume that the term "used" in both clauses means the same. In other words, your assumption that "...


7

That “shall be used for Good, not Evil” clause is a moral category, not a legal category. From a legal perspective, it is likely meaningless and/or unenforceable. Neither Debian nor users of that software should expect any legal risk for using or distributing the software. However, software under that license will never make it into Debian because it ...


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