52

You are courting seduction by the sovereign citizen doctrine. This is a crackpot legal theory that will get you nowhere. Run away as fast as you can. See, for example, Can a natural US person hold citizenship while remaining non-juridical?. See also "Mercedes-Benz Financial (DCFS Canada Corp.) v. Kovacevic, 2009", CanLII. This person fared particularly ...


41

Unfortunately for you, as long as you remain physically inside the borders of the United States you will be subject to the jurisdiction of the laws of the United States and whatever other state, county, city or town (each with its own separate body of law) you are also located at the time. (FYI: This multi-level jurisdictional framework is called federalism ...


26

You can't. This was decided definitively by the American Civil War - if a state can't leave, you certainly can't. There is no provision in the US constitution that allows for any part f the nation to leave. Of course, you can renounce your citizenship and leave.


19

You simply claim whatever you want. Getting other sovereigns to acknowledge your legitimacy is a more difficult problem. The solution is typically to gather followers, amass armies and enforce your claim as required. The US succeeded in this in the Revolutionary war. The Confederate States ultimately failed in the U.S. civil war. But the idea is the same.


18

My research has turned up no instances of anyone successfully advocating these ideas in court. These are crackpot pseudo-legal theories that have no legal validity whatsoever. And are also a bit troublesome and problematic for the rest of us. They are mostly advocated by people who: don't want to pay taxes or otherwise conform to laws they don't like; are ...


11

You could have a chat with 'Prince' Michael Bates of the Principality of Sealand. In September 1967 his father, 'Prince' Roy Bates, did something similar to what you appear to have in mind. In international law, the most common schools of thought for the creation of statehood are the constitutive and declaratory theories of state creation. The ...


11

Leave the USA If you want sovereignity over a piece of land, then you would need to figure out how to handle anyone else who claims sovereignity over it. The government of USA is currently claiming sovereignity over all its territory and (as far as I know) is not willing to negotiate over it. As long as you are on USA soil, they are free to ignore any ...


10

Canada Short version: In the mid-'90s, a Supreme Court decision and an Act of Parliament clarified the legal process under which a province could secede from Canada. While unilateral secession need not be recognized, the Canadian government would be obliged to negotiate the secession of a province following a sufficiently clear referendum result. Long ...


10

While I wholeheartedly agree with others who have said "you can't", and it is practically true, and the "All Caps" thing is definately BS, you can, theoretically start your own Micro-nation. The difficulties will be finding a place which is not governed and getting recognition of other nations. (Tongue firmly in cheek) — Maybe you can find a barge ...


6

The Star Vancouver has a good article outlining the actual charges. Meng is not charged with "violating an embargo" but with defrauding U.S. financial institutions. It may be easier to report that the "crime" is violating sanctions but it's a little more nuanced. Meng is charged with defrauding U.S. financial institutions in order to avoid sanctions. From ...


6

Not only will you need to find unclaimed land (unless you want to wage war); you may also have trouble renouncing your US citizenship. I was sure that the government can refuse to let you go until you pay all owed tax; but all proof I could find for that was a non-official web site claiming that "if a court determines that you are expatriating to avoid ...


5

International law is a tricky subject, because technically, the world is in anarchy, not all countries agree on everything (which is the number one reason countries exist). If there's one thing I learned in my political science classes in University, it's that coersion enforces the law, and the law is whatever those with the powers of coersion say it is. If ...


5

Technically you could stake such a claim in accordance with general principles of public international law, but every country has discretion about whether to recognize you as a sovereign state. Established states would likely have no interest in dealing with you until you have a certain amount of influence and resources. You might have to defend your claimed ...


5

Claiming to be independent is probably not a crime: the family that say they have set up the Principality of Sealand have never been prosecuted (though that may have something to do with the difficulty of arresting them). It does not, however, excuse a British subject from the ordinary duties of paying taxes and the like; anyone in a more accessible (and ...


4

Legal Representation: You have the right to represent yourself in a legal proceeding, but you cannot assign that right to anyone that you choose, only to certain approved individuals. Vote: You can vote, and you cannot assign that right to another. Jail Sentence: You can (indeed must) serve a jail sentence or be executed for a capital crime yourself, but ...


4

The Iran lawsuit depended on a statute directed against Iran, not applicable to the Chinese government. The Alien Tort Claims Act, which gives US federal courts original jurisdiction for torts "committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States", neither of which is likely to describe the allegation against the Chinese government. ...


3

If someone were to claim land they owned in the UK as an independent nation, and therefore refused to pay taxes or comply with building regulations, what laws would be broken and what legal action might be taken against such a person? To start with, they would be responsible for criminal and civil penalties for willfully not paying taxes and for ...


3

There is no law which allows a person to seced from the UK and declare themselves an independent nation, even if they own some piece of land. Assuming that the person has the military might to enforce their declaration of independence, they can establish whatever legal system they want (again, with the proviso that they would have to defend themselves in ...


3

I'll be referencing the "Minutes of proceedings of the Colonial Conference, 1907" throughout (600+ pg. PDF). The page numbers refer to the ones printed on the page instead of any software page number. It seems that @owjburnham's comment is essentially correct, it is mainly a shift in terminology. It came from a desire to further distinguish self-governing ...


2

If someone were to claim land they owned in the UK as an independent nation, and therefore refused to pay taxes or comply with building regulations, what laws would be broken and what legal action might be taken against such a person? The claim would be disregarded and you would be prosecuted as any British citizen who committed the same offense. This is ...


2

You can try, but prepare to face the consequences. The "only" thing you need is to be acknowledged by other countries. Having the support of at least one of superpowers, territory and population is often not enough - see Taiwan, Somaliland, Kosovo, South Osetia... There's no unclaimed continental territory. Everything is either claimed or proclaimed the ...


2

tl;dr Yes, the federal government considers Native peoples to be part of the U.S., accords them citizenship, and extends a special type of self-governing authority to the nations. Background The federal government accords recognized Native American groups a special type of self-governing authority: that of "domestic dependent nations." Cherokee Nation v. ...


2

Similar to @user6726 item about legal representation, Building Trades: Person A can do various carpentry, electrical and plumbing work on the house they own and reside in, but are restricted in their choice of person B to do it for them. Healthcare: Same with healthcare, I am guessing. Person A can slice off their own [skin tag] or sew up their wound, ...


1

Basically - the US considers any of certain acts regardless who commits them or where - illegal - and Canada has treaty obligation to detain & extradite individuals to the US who fulfil certain criteria (such as aiding and abetting the breaking of sanctions designed to limit the spread of weapons of mass destruction to 'rogue states.') Being as the ...


1

Since the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 was passed, all Native Americans born within the US have been citizens by birth. Prior to this act Native Americans were in many ways treated as foreigners by the US. They were not citizens by birth, and their tribes had some but not all of the attributes of independent nations. The latter is still true, But I belie ...


1

British Overseas Territories do not count as part of the UK. Assuming my job is disaster relief, it should justify my presence on British Virgin Islands? Assuming you were only on the BVI for a maximum of 179 days and there was a compelling work reason (e.g. you were helping out with a disaster that struck the BVI because that's your job), it's possible ...


1

One of the powers that sovereign nations have is to make treaties with other sovereign nations, these can be bi-lateral (as in the example you cite) or multi-lateral (like the Maastricht Treaty that binds the EU together). Once a treaty is agreed and signed it needs to be ratified by each country which makes it part of the domestic law in that country: for ...


1

A treaty is not a contract. Even so, if one party unilaterally breaches a contract, then they are indeed in breach and can be sued for damages. As with a contract, there are clauses about modifying or terminating the agreement by mutual agreement. The treaty does not bind individuals, it binds nations, so the actions of the father are not inherited by the ...


1

Why you are not sovereign In the first place, you are not sovereign. Sovereign means: A chief ruler with supreme power; one possessing sovereignty. (q.v.) It is also applied to a king or other magistrate with limited powers. In the UK, the sovereign is the monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. In Australia and Canada it is Queen Elizabeth II's ...


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