35

Yes, taping over a speed camera lens would be illegal. The UK common law offense of Perverting the Course of Justice would cover (pun intended) this conduct. Common law offenses are not defined by statute (a law promulgated by Parliament or a local government authority), but instead arise from the history of law as applied by the courts. This secondary ...


20

Yes, you would be responsible. Maintaining the vehicle in a state that enables compliance with the law is the owner's responsibility, and it is a driver's responsibility to comply with the speed limit. There is no knowledge or intent requirement in a speeding violation. That said, a judge might show leniency if you came to court with documentation of a ...


18

In addition to Davids answer, you would face charges of Criminal Damage, based on these notes from the Crown Prosecution Service: Damage is not defined by the Act. It should be widely interpreted to include not only permanent or temporary physical harm, but also permanent or temporary impairment of value or usefulness - Morphitis v. Salmon [1990] Crim.L.R ...


10

My story: UK passport holder, resident in Switzerland, driving from Houston to San Antonio and stopped doing 105mph in a 60mph section of highway. I was given the citation and instructions, etc., but told the officer I was leaving in 2 days and may not be able to tend to it in time. On my return to Switzerland, I called the court and asked how I could pay. ...


7

What is the correct way to handle this situation? Strictly speaking, each driver exceeding the speed limit is in violation of the traffic sign even if everybody else also infringes it. Thus it is completely valid for the police to pull & fine anyone from among those drivers. Statutes like the one you mention are intended for scenarios where a driver ...


6

I looked for a link to the CJIB pages on paying fines in monthly bits. It is here: https://www.cjib.nl/betalen-delen-aanvragen-voor-een-verkeersboete. He will have to make a request for such an arrangement at the CJIB himself. It will depend on what type of communication he has received from the authorities, and how quickly he responds to it.


5

In Germany, you must not drive faster than reasonable under the circumstances. Since there is a sign covered by snow, that should keep your speed low. Since there is also a speed limit sign and you don't know what the speed limit is, that should also keep your speed considerably low to be on the safe side. I'd recommend that you make a judgement call what ...


5

Texas and California are actually what are called Presumed Speeding states, unlike most others which are Absolute Speeding states. (There is a little known third category called Basic, but this is uncommon). In a presumed speeding state, a speed-limit violation offers someone in your shoes far more flexibility in building your defense than the more common ...


5

The prosecutor may not offer evidence of you being merely arrested or issued a ticket. This answer is based on the federal rules of evidence and depending on how similar they are to the Texas rules you may or may not prevail. To address some additional concerns, let's delve into a segment on the rules and procedure in a courtroom. Your past criminal record ...


5

One wouldn't be able to make a claim about a driving record without it being testimony. Testimony will be challenged during cross examination. The prosecutor won't be able to bring up prior bad acts (such as previous speeding tickets) but will most certainly be allowed to rebut any claim of no prior bad acts made by a defendant. When the defendant claims a ...


5

Obviously the police isn't checking all the time that all the speed limit signs are still where they should be, so in practice you would get a speeding ticket, which the police officer would give you with a good conscience. And you might very well think that you missed the sign, and pay the fine without complaining. If you are sure there was no sign, you ...


5

The US Department of Transportation does not "recognize" fast lanes, or have any limits on highway speed, which are determined by the states. Here is a resource on the various keep-right laws of the states. No state has a "fast lane" that allows speeds greater that the legal limit, nor does any state have a law requiring drivers to drive exactly the posted ...


5

If you were moving "with the flow of traffic" but over the limit, you were still breaking the law, and the cop can choose which car or cars to stop on any basis or none (except ones forbidden, such as racial in the US). This is almost surely not a valid defense, not in any jurisdiction that I know of at least. If you can show that to slow to the speed ...


5

The person who is changing lanes has the responsibility to make sure that they have space to move into. Suppose there was a person in front of you in the destination lane who hit the brakes suddenly - if you change lanes and rear-end them, that's your fault, because you failed to leave enough distance. I don't see how it's any different in this case, where ...


4

Typically - in fact - in almost all cases - there are no posted, regulatory speed limits for on- and off- ramps. This article proved interesting. Specifically, Those ramp speed signs, black numerals on a yellow field, are advisory only. They have no force of law. The only regulatory speed signs are the black-on-white speed limits posted on the roadway ...


4

California Vehicle Code chapter 11, division 7, article 1, section 22350: No person shall drive a vehicle upon a highway at a speed greater than is reasonable or prudent having due regard for weather, visibility, the traffic on, and the surface and width of, the highway, and in no event at a speed which endangers the safety of persons or property. ...


4

This varies widely depending on the jurisdiction, but you'll often see speeding tickets downgraded to a non-moving offense like "improper equipment" when the speedometer is broken. You'd want to check the jurisdictions you're interested in to see how they define improper equipment. Edit: here's an example from NC that sig_seg_v alludes to: N.C.G.S....


4

It would appear that moving violations within the United States (like the speeding tickets) may result in either a civil, a misdemeanor or a criminal charge, depending on the state and the speed. I would indeed recommend you try to follow PassKit's advise, to see if you could get an exception for being based abroad. Otherwise, some states, like California, ...


4

It is the job of the judge to instruct the jury about the law. If Texas had pattern instructions I'd look up what the instruction is for this matter, but you don't, so I don't know what the judge would say. But it is the judge's sole prerogative to instruct the jury in the law. If the question is a "commitment question", then it is an improper question and ...


4

RCW 46.61.419 gives government police the right to enforce speeding violations as defined in RCW 46.61.400 in certain communities (condominiums and gated communities), per RCM 64.34, 64.32, or 64.38, if: (1) A majority of the homeowner's association's, association of apartment owners', or condominium association's board of directors votes to ...


4

is it worth the money to have a lawyer and see if they could help me get this ticket off my record? No. It is not worth the money and, absent very unusual circumstances, a lawyer is unlikely to be meaningfully more successful than dealing directly with the prosecutor in the case. Your best, cost effective option is to contact the prosecutor's office to ...


4

Law enforcement sometimes use "pacing" as a speed enforcement tool. The basic idea is that they consistently drive a certain speed - which is at or above the speed limit and notice that the "alleged speeder" is either keeping pace or exceeding the pace. The details are complicated and a police officer would know them much better than me. But basically ...


4

Everyone has the duty to avoid accidents, at all times. When you change lanes, you have more than the normal duty: You have to check that the other lane is empty, that there is no slow traffic in front of you in that lane that you would bump into, and that there is no fast traffic behind you in that lane that would bump into you. You even have to check the ...


3

There are only two rules I am aware of that apply to rear-end collisions on a roadway (in which all vehicles are properly headed in the same direction): The first vehicle that hits another in the rear is at fault for the collision, and any collateral collisions. The preceding rule is always true unless there is evidence that the vehicle that was struck did ...


3

Here is a link to the relevant Texas Statute: Title 7, Subtitle C, Chapter 545, Subchapter A: Sec. 545.351. MAXIMUM SPEED REQUIREMENT. (a) An operator may not drive at a speed greater than is reasonable and prudent under the circumstances then existing. Combine that with: Sec. 545.352. PRIMA FACIE SPEED LIMITS. (a) A speed in excess of the ...


3

In CA, with no papers given to you, there is no ticket. You are required to sign the ticket, which you obviously did not do.


3

UK seat belt law is here. What you were doing is illegal and carries a fine of £500. As to your specific questions: How illegal is this? It is not a criminal offence in any way. What is the possibility of me getting caught? If a police officer notices you will almost certainly be booked. What is the possibility of being noticed? Depends where you ...


3

If the speed limit is only on a express lane in a freeway, it means the cars in the express lane on the freeway must be slowed down to 30 miles per hour or slower, but the cars in the other lane (the collector lane) in the freeway must be 85 miles per hour or slower. If after the speed limit on the express lane there is a 85 miles per hour speed limit on ...


3

Yes there are pretty certain speed limits on freeways. Let's have a look at ORS 811.130: (1) A person commits the offense of impeding traffic if the person drives a motor vehicle or a combination of motor vehicles in a manner that impedes or blocks the normal and reasonable movement of traffic. "normal and reasonable" are the keywords here. Driving ...


2

Answer Yes. You should care. There are at least two ways you could get into trouble. Problem #1: Extradition The U.S. has extradition treaties with the UK and Switzerland for non-death-penalty related criminal offenses. Of which, criminal speeding is one. However, as a practical matter, I would estimate it is unlikely you would ever be extradited for ...


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