7

Insofar as those treaties don't bind the US, the notion of "violating" such laws is moot. Hoda Muthana is, under Yemeni law, a Yemeni citizen (it is immaterial whether she has ever "accepted" or exploited it), and as such stripping her of US citizenship would not leave her stateless. In the case of Hoda Muthana, the action is based on the legal argument ...


6

Short answer: You find a country who is willing to recognize you as stateless, and issue you travel papers. At that point you can enter the U.S. by applying for a visa. The USA really does not want to create stateless people. They are laboring diplomatically to eradicate statelessness. As such, the State Department will want to see that you are secure in ...


5

What you claim isn’t true. You can’t usually get German citizenship if you have another citizenship. You can (possibly) get German citizenship if you tried to get rid of another citizenship and failed. You still have the other citizenship, you are not stateless. It’s just that Germany would make an exception for you and allow you to have two citizenships in ...


3

First, let's be clear. Under the relevant Australian law, this person is an Australian citizen, This is for two reasons. First, because he or she is descended from someone who was born in Australia in the time period from January 26, 1949 to August 19, 1986 (or who was a British subject born in Australia prior to January 26, 1949), and second, because a ...


3

It does not appear there are any provisions for stateless people to enter the US or identify themselves therein. The US didn't ratify the UN Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons. If you manage to get into the US you will not be able to open a bank account or do anything else that requires ID.


3

There are nations in the world that do not allow you to renounce citizenship That is a matter for those countries. However, whether another country considers you to be a citizen of any country is a matter for that country's domestic law. So, whether Germany considers you to be a Turkish citizen or not is a matter for Germany - not Turkey. That is not to say ...


3

The case that you mentioned isn't an example of what you're talking about. One thing that immediately comes to mind is the Shamima Begum case. She fled her London home to join the Islamic state but now she wants to come back to the UK (after realizing), but UK's Home Office revoked her citizenship, claiming that she could claim Bangladesh citizenship by ...


2

US law (8 USC 1451) allows the revocation of naturalization, and does not restrict such revocation to people having any particular actual or potential citizenship. The US is also not a party to the statelesness conventions. So it is possible to legally make a person stateless. The nationality law of Syria is kind of complex, being of the paternal jus ...


1

I believe that, generally, who is a country's national or citizen is solely determined by the law of that country, and there is no general "international law" regarding revoking citizenship. There is that Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, and countries that are party to it agree to not revoke citizenship if it would make the person stateless (...


1

Your scenario as written is impossible. If one is born in the US, then they cannot lose their citizenship before they turn 18 (and it is rather difficult to lose it accidentally; in order to lose de solis citizenship in the US, one must "intentionally revoke it"; generally speaking, you have to go to a US consulate (in another country) and formally renounce ...


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