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7

Landlord-tenant law is an area that is heavily statute-based, jurisdiction-dependent, and far from uniform across the country. A complex, specific, multi-part question like this one is not going to get a simple answer. In general, though, I can clear up some of the confusion with a quick example. Let's say you abandon your lease, but as you do so, you ...


5

There's a lot of variables here, as many leases are built in different ways within the leeway allowed by law. You will want to contact a local lawyer to see how you can mitigate the damage to yourself, and contact your landlord and see if you can re-negotiate the lease. If the landlord doesn't want to re-negotiate, you're probably facing eviction if you can'...


4

Call, write, or visit the office of your legislative representative. This page can help you figure out who that is. They have the ability to introduce a bill into the legislature that would change the law, and that's the best way to change a law like what you're trying to do here. Be sure to tell the legislator exactly what you think should be changed (...


4

When the end of month comes, if no suitable roommate has been found and my ex-roommate (and still current co-signer) refuses to pay his share of the rent, can I sue him in small claims court? Might it be worth my while to hire a lawyer to sue him? Rent is ~$1,600 so $800 is definitely within the limits of small claims, but I don't want to pay my ...


4

Payable in advance means that you are paying for services prior to receiving them. Compare with payable in arrears, where you pay for something after receiving the service. In your situation, payable in advance means that the payment you make is for the period to come, rather than for the period just elapsed.


3

You would need to know the landlord's reasons for refusal in order to determine their reasonableness or otherwise. If there is a dispute about this (i.e. They think they are reasonable and you don't) you can seek a court order requiring the landlord to accept the sublease or alternatively, that since the landlord has breached the contract, you are entitled ...


3

As a general rule, legal language is interpreted loosely with respect to singular versus plural, or male versus female (in interpreting pronouns). A clause that uses the word "tenant" can thus be construed as referring to multiple tenants, and "tenants" can also refer to a single tenant. Likewise, "he, him" refers to a third person, regardless of gender. If ...


3

First of all, the amount involved is probably a few hundred dollars, maybe a thousand: if you do not pay it is extremely unlikely that your roommate will attempt to recover. Even if they do, they will probably fail - 30 days notice is 30 days notice: unless last month was February, the 8th to the 8th is either 30 or 31 days, you have complied with the terms ...


3

Here's the problem. You are responsible for 100% of the rent. I think you know that. Oh yeah, the cops aren't going to do anything. There nothing for them. This is a civil matter. So you are 100% responsible for the rent. Your roommate is responsible for 100% also. But since you are not going to be paying 200% you probably have an agreement to split this ...


3

You are allowed to sublet the whole of the premises but not part of it (VIII a); if you do you must create the agreement mentioned, pay to have it stamped by the government and pay £10 + VAT to the landlord. You must only use the premises as a domicile for one family; better make sure you rent those rooms to your cousins.


2

If you have already paid out the lease, there is nothing for the landlord to mitigate. Under abandonment, the rent is not paid for the term of the lease. The mitigation statute is to dampen excessive, unnecessary damages. If you pay your rent, there are no damages. (If you do not pay, the landlord would have some responsibility to entertain new lessors, ...


2

You are all the tenant jointly (meaning an act or omission by one of you is an act or omission by all of you) and severally (meaning you are each individually responsible for the obligations under the contract e.g. you are each responsible for ensuring all of the rent is paid, you are not responsible for just one third of it). This has nothing to do with ...


2

First, you need to understand that there are 2 agreements here: one is the contract between the landlord and A, B & C (jointly and severally) which is a legally binding contract [the lease] and the other is the agreement between A, B & C which might be (but probably isn't) a legally binding contract [the roommate agreement]. If C can sublease and to ...


2

If your business doesn't pay its sales taxes or certain kinds of excise taxes, like tobacco taxes, alcohol taxes, and gasoline taxes, of property taxes on moveable business property, that can result in a tax lien being imposed on the business or even conceivably, its leasehold. If taxes or utilities for which the tenant is responsible are paid late, late ...


2

As far as the law is concerned with respect to the sublease, you are in the same position as any other manager/renter/owner. You are bound by the statute, and you must return the security deposit (and/or itemized deductions) within 30 days of the end of the sublease. The agreement between you and your landlord has no bearing on your agreement with your ...


1

It seems you have learned a lesson in making sure you keep your paperwork in order. That said I can't imagine a reasonable judge coming back and saying that because you lack the landlord's written permission to sublet, the subleter is now allowed to squat in the landlord's space. That would be an absurd result. Obviously this is no guarantee as judges are ...


1

Break the lease. Leave early and advise the agent, "I am leaving early in breach of the lease, I have found person X (references and police check attached) who is ready, willing and able to sign a lease on the same terms and conditions for the balance of my term or longer. I freely acknowledge that this is a breach of the contract but, in the circumstances ...


1

If two parties form a contract (assumed to be legal in every way) that requires one or both parties not to form similar contracts with any other party, this is an exclusivity arrangement. They are extremely common in agreements involving tenancy and copyright, and are not unknown in agreements involving employment and trade/service provision. Forming the ...


1

To answer the headline question: yes, text messages are as binding as any other form of communication. They are on par with any other written communication like a letter or email and are better than a verbal communication because they create a permanent record. To answer the subtext: you probably don't need to worry about being sued. Because the terms of ...


1

The local country sheriff's department - not the police - handle lease and tenant issues. You can call the police, and they would look into the paperwork, but more than likely they would defer to the county. In your case, it is probably Fulton County you should talk to; see fultoncountyga.gov: Evictions One possibility is you can talk to the landlord about ...


1

It isn't at all obvious to me why a true "sublease" which creates a legal property right in certain defined real estate in exchange for some amount of rent to the exclusion of occupancy by the primary tenant, would really be necessary in the situation that you describe. One can grant someone permission to use your space, and even charge them money for ...


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