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I suspect that the second "if" is subordinate to the first "if," so it only applies to people with more than one citizenship. I think it should say: If you are not a resident in any country in which you have citizenship, enter the country of citizenship where you were most recently a resident. (Added text in italics) In other words, the sentence helps ...


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If a foreigner who doesn't live in the US as main residence and therefore doesn't have tax residence there (i.e he's not liable to US income taxes) own a house in NYC, can he receive property taxes bills (or demands of payment or any technicay fitting name) via mail and then pay them via banking, or home banking in case he cannot pay them in the US?...


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The exemption is not unconditional (xi) Services provided by a licensed esthetician, licensed electrologist, licensed manicurist, licensed barber, or licensed cosmetologist provided that the individual: (I) Sets their own rates, processes their own payments, and is paid directly by clients. (II) Sets their own hours of work and has sole ...


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Generally speaking, you can not "turn your back" on income you are entitled to receive. So the best way to avoid your problem is to make sure you are not "entitled" to that income. If your organization feels to strongly about paying for your services, it can make a contribution to another NPC "on your behalf" or something along those lines. Frankly, the ...


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That would be the moment you came into the possession of the item. Specific to the clause, it's looking for the fair market value of the item (if it's not a specific dollar sum) when you received it (once upon a time, during the Ming Dynasty, you could get Ming Vases for a lot cheaper than you can today, since that Dynasty ended in 1644 and by default any ...


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It is tax fraud And breach of employment law If you are working for a company you don’t own, that company must pay you the minimum wage for your work and that must be taxed. Any profits the company makes also need to be taxed, either in the USA or where the company is domiciled. If there is no tax treaty between the USA and that country it will need to pay ...


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Each entity is taxed on its own income So yes, you need to file multiple returns. Or wait until the start of new financial year to change structures so each is operating only in one period.


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The Validity of State Wealth Taxes Yes. States can impose wealth taxes, although this doesn't clarify the validity of a federal wealth tax. States have broader taxing power than the federal government in terms of kinds of taxes that they may constitutionally impose. A state may impose any tax (1) that does not unduly discriminate against a federally ...


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if you sell less then 25 1oz Maple Leaf gold coins, you do not have to file a 1099-B at the time of the sale. You still have to report the proceeds on Schedule D when you file your income taxes for the year.


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For example if you are a British actress and try that kind of stunt, you will suddenly find HMRC coming after you and all newspapers reporting about it (and nobody feeling sorry for you when HMRC tries to make you sell your home). The definition of “loan” includes repayment. If enough time goes past without any attempt at repayment, HMRC can unilaterally ...


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Tax evasion has an extremely loose definition. You don't even need to do that, there are corp to Corp evasions where you pay an LLC your salary so it never touched a "person" and was an equity investment and not income. If tax law was enforced literally then nobody would collect taxes. Taxes depend on the government arbitrarily grabbing things and law does ...


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Non-commercial loans aren’t loans A company can legitimately lend shareholders money if it does so on commercial terms - over a realistic time frame at commercial interest and receives regular repayment of at least the interest and will ultimately receive the principal. The company will need to pay tax on its interest income and that interest may or may not ...


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No, the government does not have to accept cash as payment. Neither in coun or in bills. https://www.expertlaw.com/library/consumer-protection/it-legal-refuse-cash-payment There is a catch here though. You do have the right to a jury if you are sued for not paying. Don't allow for a bench trial, request a jury. Be sure to know the legal procedure for asking ...


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