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No. From here: Organisations must not send marketing texts to individuals without their specific, valid and prior explicit consent. This consent must be recorded and kept as proof of consent. There is a limited exception for previous customers, which is known as the soft opt-in. A soft-opt in only applies if the organisation have obtained the ...


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There are two main concerns: copyright restrictions on distributing stuff that other people made, and publicity rights to use other people's picture and voice to promote a product. Both restrictions reduce to the fact that you need the rights-holder's permission to use the material. It is not required that the permission be written on paper or that it be ...


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The first part is a matter of jurisdiction. I do not believe that simply using a cell phone with an Illinois number will give the Illinois courts jurisdiction, if you're standing in Wisconsin and calling a person in Wisconsin. Also, when you state that the call is recorded for ___ purposes, does that have any bearing on the actual use (e.g. they state ...


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Yes. As a utility, telephone carriers (both landline and cell carriers) are immune from unlawful communications crossing over their networks. The responsibility of any illicit form of speech (such that there is in the United States. The most common is falsely calling 911 (true threat doctrine)), though I'm sure someone somewhere has discussed criminal ...


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I am not a lawyer. I am not your lawyer. Etc. An online definition of "from": Used to indicate a source, cause, agent, or instrument. Bob is an employee of B, but is acting as an agent of A. An agent is legal "One who agrees and is authorized to act on behalf of another, a principal, to legally bind an individual in particular business transactions with ...


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In the US, there is actually a lot of legislation that protects people from such annoyances. For example, if you are on the National Do Not Call List then telemarketers are not allowed to call you. They will still call anyway on occasion, "by accident". You can then ask them to take you off the list, and they will usually comply. Unfortunately you will have ...


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State T and state C have jurisdiction. Twist 1: doesn't matter - just because people don't know where you are doesn't mean local law stops applying Twist 2: it still remains a state C telecommunications channel so they still have jurisdiction, in addition, the state where the person is does too. Twist 3: then state P also has jurisdiction In all cases, "...


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