45

The clause you highlighted has an "or" in front of it: "..., or in such pretended character...". It's only one alternative. Demanding or obtaining money, etc, is sufficient to violate the statute but not necessary. Looking at the previous clause, it is still a violation if the pretender merely "acts as such", which I suppose ...


35

While software is often the subject of pirating, the term is also used generally for unauthorized use of any copyrighted material. It turns out that this terminology is very old. Wikipedia notes that this sense of the word piracy is attested as far back as 1603 CE and was used as part of the language of a copyright treaty as early as 1886 CE. In particular,...


34

This is called solicitation. A person is guilty of solicitation to commit a crime if with the purpose of promoting or facilitating its commission he commands, encourages or requests another person to engage in specific conduct which would constitute such crime. Model Penal Code § 5.02.


32

The term "illegal" is also often used for actions that the law prohibits, but that give rise to civil liability, rather than criminal prosecution. We see such use a lot in questions on Law.SE. One also says that a person "is liable" when there are grounds for a civil suit against that person. One might also say that such a person "has commited a tort" or "...


25

Jurist (in the American sense) means a lawyer, judge, or other expert in law. From Google Search:


24

“Illegal” is not limited to criminal matters Illegal and unlawful are synonymous and refer to any conduct which is in breach of any law. So: Murder is illegal and a crime Stopping in a No Stopping zone is illegal and a civil offence Breaking a contract is illegal and exposes the breacher to civil damages


18

Lawyers and judges are both Legal Professionals


16

You are looking for extraterritorial jurisdiction: As the term indicates, it connotes the exercise of jurisdiction, or legal power, outside territorial borders. This can include nations claiming jurisdiction over crimes in nearby bodies of water and to specific categories of crimes (such as sexual offenses against underage victims) committed by or ...


16

Normally, the term "benefit of the doubt", if it was used, would mean that ambiguities should be resolved in favor of the person entitled to it. This could be applied to contract interpretation or to statutory interpretation. Here is an example: When dealing with restrictions on campaign spending and speech, a court's construction must “give the ...


11

While less specific than the term mentioned by @DavidSiegel (i.e. an "Antinomy"), "impossibility", "impossibility of performance", and "impracticability" are more frequently used. If the obligation is imposed by contract rather than by a statute or regulation, the term "frustration of purpose" is also ...


10

No, it means the following are eligible: Natural born citizens Citizens of the United States, at the time of the adoption of the constitution The second part was to allow people that were citizens of the US in 1788 (but were obviously not "natural born citizens", since the US didn't exist when they were born) to be eligible for the Presidency. Check out ...


10

A severability clause means that any clause in the contract which is itself illegal, or which would make the contract illegal, or otherwise cannot be enforced according to the relevant law, is instead excluded from the contract as if it didn't exist. This is an extremely common clause, especially where the contract is used in the same form across multiple ...


10

In england-and-wales the offence is encouraging an offence contrary to s.44 of the Serious Crime Act 2007. Here, we make no distinction between the level or type of offence being encouraged. Previously, the offence was inciting the commission of another offence contrary to Common Law which was abolished by s.59 of the 2007 Act.


8

Legalese The purpose of a legal document is to set out the rights and responsibilities so that: they can understand them, a third party (e.g. a judge) can rule on them in the event of a dispute. These two requirements are often in tension. We have about 1,000 years of legal precedent where certain words and phrases (sometimes in Latin rather than English)...


8

The phrase officer of the court means (according to dictionary.law.com) any person who has an obligation to promote justice and effective operation of the judicial system, including judges, the attorneys who appear in court, bailiffs, clerks and other personnel. As officers of the court lawyers have an absolute ethical duty to tell judges the truth, ...


8

The other answers are good, but no one touched on the other part of the question relating to why people pirate software. (Not sure if the why is off topic for LSE, but I saw it wasn't addressed) Some of the reasons I'm familiar with are The pirate doesn't have the money to pay for the software The pirate wouldn't normally buy the software, but would use it ...


8

From the initial version of the post: Would tricking an employee into thinking that they can be personally sued for asking a customer to wear a mask be a "thing of value" such that the law could be applied? Regardless of actionability under the statute you point out, there are other penal statutes --be it from state or federal law-- which do not ...


7

Comments here and here suggest that "irreconcilable differences" can be used to explain "withdrawal when the client fails to compensate the attorney", but it can mean many other things. The point of the phrase is to not divulge the reason. Amidst the various scenarios discussed under Rule 1.16(b), subsections (3) and (4) permit ...


7

"Pirating" software means gaining unlicensed or unauthorized access to software. The "crackers" (as they are known in the underground) who create these illicit method of access do so in many ways. They can either create "software cracks" which bypass the authentication mechanisms. Or they create "Keygens" which generate valid keys for the software. Both of ...


7

None The contractual chain is you <-> warranty company <-> (potentially others you don’t know about) <-> service provider. Should something go wrong, you would sue your warranty company who might (it is up to them) then sue the service provider. Notwithstanding, it’s likely the service company owes you a duty of care and would be directly liable ...


7

In a deposition, attorneys are supposed to keep their objections short and refrain from making an objection that indicates to the witness how he should answer. A question might be objectionable because it lacks foundation, because it is compound, because it calls for speculation, etc. Example 2, for instance, could be said to assume that Ms. Redacted was ...


7

Such a situation is known as an "Antinomy". That is, "a real or apparent mutual incompatibility of two laws". The Free Dictionary says this means: An expression in law and logic to indicate that two authorities, laws, or propositions are inconsistent with each other.


6

Counterfeit is a fake. It's made to look like the real thing. Pirated is an unauthorized manufacture of the real thing. Contraband is a thing that is imported (or exported) illegally. This can also include things that are explicitly illegal, such as narcotics or firearms, for instance in a prison, even if they are legal to import or export (as mentioned ...


6

There is not a single legal term that encompasses all of these offenses in most jurisdictions. Instead, there are a number of different offenses that could apply based upon whether or not there is sexual contact, the nature of the coercion involved, and certain other details of the offense. To use a concrete and precise example, I provide the exact language ...


6

I love Wikipedia to bits, but it's sometimes worth reading the "talk" pages as well as the article, and trying a few other sources. I think this one comes closer : Damages attempt to measure in financial terms the extent of harm a plaintiff has suffered because of a defendant's actions. In the paragraph you're translating, "damages" is ...


6

"The benefit of the doubt" describes who gets the benefit in the case where there is doubt. It does not describe in any way what qualifies as "doubt". In some cases, a preponderance of evidence is all that's needed for there to be "no" doubt, while in others, it requires a conclusion to be reached "beyond a reasonable doubt&...


5

Legalese is unnecessary. My first mortgage was from a bank that prided itself on not using it - the closing documents were about twenty pages, and the seller's attorney was amazed at how plainly written my bank's stuff was. My favorite was the letter of confirmation they sent when we went into contract. It was one line that essentially said, "if the seller ...


5

There isn't a difference. The terminology in England and Wales that means the same thing is "litigant in person", with the source of these Latin phrases have abandoned them in favor of plain English terminology. The variation of usage, however, does not necessarily break down on a federal v. state court basis. Pro se is the majority usage, but the variation ...


5

This is sense A. 1b of ‘special’ in the Oxford English Dictionary: Designating a thing: specific, individual or particular to the specified person, thing or set. Now rare (in later use tending to merge with or be understood as sense A. 4a). Special damages are those that can be specified by reference to particular expenses. They are not exceptional or ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible