Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

New answers tagged

2

It totally depends on the countries (versus languages) of your target audience. A Chinese version of a website domiciled in the UK does not necessarily target visitors living in China. Absent any other clues, it targets visitors who prefer to use Chinese language. These can potentially be anywhere: for those in the UK you will need to have mere translation ...


2

International contracts are tricky (Which is not to say that intra-national ones aren't tricky) Let's say you are based in the United States and put in your terms of service that it will be governed by the laws of Washington - like this. While choice of law is generally upheld as valid in most jurisdictions, there are some local laws that cannot be ...


2

Should a multi-language website have different privacy policy and terms of use content for the languages it implements? No, absolutely never. Even if you opt to have translated versions of your terms of use available, every single version of your terms needs to include all of the same content. You cannot guarantee a French user will read the French language ...


0

An example of a site that does text to speech conversions is Google Translate. I might illegally copy a book into the input box and have it play back either the English version or the translated Icelandic version, and my action would be infringing. Google however is not subject to liability thanks to the safe harbor provisions of the DMCA. There is Article ...


0

If the resultant audio is only for personal use, then it is unlikely to be an infringing copy. The UK's Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 as amended has 28B Personal copies for private use The making of a copy of a work, other than a computer program, by an individual does not infringe copyright in the work provided that the copy— (a) is a ...


0

Typically a ToS is a very one sided agreement. It says things like "our company can do X, Y and Z if we feel like it and you agree not to complain". It rarely says anything like "our company promises to always do X". Indeed, they deliberately word the ToS to be voluntary for them, because otherwise you could sue them in the way you describe, and they don't ...


0

We should touch on the point that suing people over emotional slights experienced in online activity, is a fruitless endeavour. Further, entertaining fantasies about suing people, is hopeless, and ultimately demoralizes and weakens the thinker. Platforms themselves have broad immunity to being sued due to the conduct of their users, under a law called ...


2

The Terms-of-Service are a legal contract between the user and the website (or something like that - the actual force of such a click-through contract most people don't really read is disputed in some jurisdictions). This only affects the relationship between these two legal entities. So unless the terms of service explicitly guarantee the user a slander-...


0

Both solutions are legally invalid (although your client's idea is better) There are a number of things that must happen to create a binding contract (see What is a contract and what is required for them to be valid?). One of these is that both parties must agree to be legally bound. When they download the app, the user is agreeing if you give them a click-...


2

Its etiquette to abide by a websites robots.txt file, if that file disallows scraping of certain sites, but whether scraping breaches anything other than a boilerplate terms of use is very much undecided in law right now (you don't state a jurisdiction, so I will assume the US) in that various arguments have been tried and both succeeded and failed depending ...


1

In general, contracts are assignable be either party unless they are for personal services or expressly provide that they aren’t. Apart from the practicalities of performing the contract, there is no requirement to inform when assignment takes place. So, if the previous company had a valid contract with you and they or the new company provided services for ...


Top 50 recent answers are included