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3

No that's definitely not a good idea. A privacy policy/terms document is supposed to reflect your situation: local laws for both PP/Terms describe exactly what your company does for both PP/Terms and identify you as a company What you will do however, is to describe the service providers you're using, in that case you would link to them, from your own ...


14

It would be terribly risky for you to simply link another company's terms of service. What if they take their server down? What if they change their terms? You would not even know when exactly the changes were made. Copying their terms means you might run into copyright issues on the text. Either pay a lawyer to write your ToS for you, or see if you can ...


-1

Yes. I own a developing website. You can even create your own terms of service/terms of use. Now what I would do personally is to recommend to the site owner to script moderator or administrator roles and assign trusted people to those roles, sort of stack exchange does but not with the community. I would also say set up a punishment code of conduct and say, ...


0

The scope of the clause is the scope that the clause defines If you agree to a clause that says "You indemnify us if {circumstance}" then if {circumstance} happens they can rely on the indemnity. For example, when you buy home insurance, your insurer indemnified you for {conditions} which include (among other things) your house catching fire. If ...


-3

For server owners, it’s a copyright infringement. As a player playing private servers, it goes against Blizzard’s ToS, but there's no law or personal punishment. Source: Are WoW Private Servers Legal?


5

YES There are many services that are offered for free but bound to specific terms. For example Twitter tells you to obey the acceptable use guidelines and the stack has rules on what conduct is allowed. The ToS are the main thing how they ensure that the user has been informed of what they can do, and what you can do. They are a simple contract of adherence: ...


10

Yes, you can. An excellent example is this very website - at the bottom of this page you will find a series of links in the footer, one of which is "Terms of Service". I think you will agree that most people using the Law SE are making no money from it or paying no money to use it and yet the terms of service sets out in black and white what a user ...


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