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11

That will be determined later by the courts. You might think so, if Facebook etc. were strictly private platforms. Knight First Amdt. Inst. at Columbia Univ. v. Trump, 928 F. 3d 226 somewhat undermines that thinking. The court disallowed Trump from exercising ordinary First Amendment control over his account. In reviewing the lower court finding, After ...


6

most likely The government can't compel people to some sort of speech under the 1st amendment. Forcing a company to host people is compelled speech by the company. It is well established, that the government can't compel a newspaper to host its messages as it wants. The key case might be Miami Herald Publishing Co. v. Tornillo 418 US 241 (1974). In this case,...


5

Yes as wearing (or not wearing) a mask is not a protected trait so there is nothing protecting a patron from being removed. While you make reference to religious garb a mask is not religious garb and should not be compared to that. https://www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/restaurants-right-to-refuse-service.html While there are a few exceptions under ...


2

Under US federal law, specifically the The Civil Rights Act of 1964, a restaurant or other place of public accommodation may no refuse service because of sex, race, national origin, or religion. Relatively recently, discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation has been held to be sex discrimination. These are the protected classes. Under the ADA ...


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