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Since there is no united-states tag, I will post this answer (well, more like an addition) for completeness. In Russia, it's not a crime to lie on nationwide censuses. In fact, a person being surveyed cannot even be enforced to give the information about themselves (gender, age, ethnicity etc.) by the surveyor: see Russian Federal Law No. 8 issued 25/1/2002 (...


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It depends what the question is. If it refers to the future, as in how will you vote in the forthcoming elections, then it is impossible to lie about the future. As someone once said you must have a laser focus on the question. The explanatory notes for the UK Census say You must complete the census by law. If you do not, or if you supply false information ...


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In the US at least, a response to a survey (verbal or written) is a form of speech. You can't be generically compelled to give accurate, truthful answers to all surveys you'll ever encounter. Certain official government surveys (the census, etc) are sufficiently important to justify mandatory truthfulness, but that list is rather short and those surveys ...


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According to the NBC news site: "Federal law provides that anyone who refuses to answer or willfully neglects to answer any of the questions in connection with any census or survey shall be fined a maximum of $100, or a maximum of $500 if the person gives false information." The Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey as its primary ...


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There are a very few government surveys which it is a crime to lie in responding to, most notably, census related surveys. Proving that a representation is false with respect to some questions (e.g. race or nationality) are challenging to prove and the subject of lots of hypothetical discussion. But proving misrepresentation with respect to other matters (e....


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Is lying on a survey illegal? An intentional misrepresentation is actionable to the extent that (1) it causes harm, and (2) the surveyor's reliance on those representations is justified. The latter implies that the surveyor ought to make a judicious use of the information available: the surveyed person might not have been duly informed of how his answers ...


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It depends on the purpose for lying and the jurisdiction. If there are any unfair or fraudulent advantages be gained by lying then it might be unlawful. A hyperthetical example: those employees with an allergy may get a payrise to cover the cost of their medication or the employer may pay for add-ons to their health insurance. Someone who falsely claims ...


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