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When you need information like this, you generally just need to start searching court websites. If the case is in a court's online database, just having one party's name will almost always be enough to find the case. Unfortunately, our court systems are so balkanized that proving the negative -- that Hamilton never sued anyone over "Pulsar" -- ...


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Given the following: We know the name of the plaintiff, The name is likely to be unique so that there won't be too many cases involving a different party with the same name, and The plaintiff is a company so it is not likely to have been involved in an overwhelming number of cases (as opposed to e.g. the IRS); The approach I would use would be to search a ...


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What is considered a seal in this context? The statue in question states "Whoever fraudulently or wrongfully affixes or impresses the seal of any department or agency of the United States" The FDA has no seal per se, but the USDA does. I suspect that you could spend a lot of time arguing that under the statute you can use any logo you want for any ...


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In general, if a person or firm uses a trademark, or a word, phrase, logo, or symbol that is similar to a trademark to promote, market, or identify goods or services (products), and reasonable consumers could be confused into falsely thinking that the products come from the same source as that identified with the trademark, or are approved, endorsed or ...


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