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It may be illegal to use the item for its intended purpose. As an example, construction codes typically require use of certified or approved building materials. Counterfeits are readily available from direct mail vendors - just look at the glut of very cheap to-be-wired-in smart switches and cheap fixtures found on sketchy direct-mail sites, including the ...


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While the question specifically asks about UK law, similar principles apply in united-states law. Thus I will answer for the same issue in US law. The relevant section of US Federal law is 18 U.S. Code § 2320 - Trafficking in counterfeit goods or services. This declares that anyone is a criminal who: (1) traffics in goods or services and knowingly uses a ...


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A video game can certainly refer to other well known games, just as many books refer to other books by other authors. Such literary references have long precedent and are not copyright infringements. However, IF a sizable amount of the plot or contents of another game are reproduced, that is quite another matter. When a grams is described as: first level is ...


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If the buyer wanted the watch for purely personal reasons, would they be committing any crime? NO The offences are at s.92 of the Trade Marks Act 1994 and all relate to either selling, or possessing as part of a business, such goods with... a view to gain for himself or another, or with intent to cause loss to another, and without the consent of the ...


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In short, no, purchasing counterefeit good for personal reasons is legal. As long as you do not sell or legally claim the goods to be authentic (for insurance reasons or other), there is no law that stops you buying them, at least in the UK. However, there are other risks involved, for example: you could be sponsoring terrorism or organised crime some ...


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Yes, that's true Common words are not trademarkable, as is a descriptive phrase, because a trademark needs to be distinctive. As the Netherland Trademark Office tells you, your mark can't fit in any of these categories: literal - Your tradename or logo must not literal describe or depict your goods or services. promotion - The trademark must amount to more ...


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Very strong You can see in the photograph that the Satan’s Shoes have Nike’s trademark “swoosh” clearly visible. A reasonable person could easily be confused that the Satan’s Shoe is a Nike product. That’s the essence of trademark infringement.


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The rule on a tagline is really not significantly different from that on a logo, or brand name. If anywhere in the packaging, advertising, or promotion of a product or service, a registered or protected trademark of another is used, without permission from the holder, in such a way that a reasonable consumer might plausible believe that the product is made ...


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Copyright Issues Thar Archie comics including the character of Jughead were fist published in 1942. They are still protected by copyright in the US, and almost certifiably in Finland as well, depending on who is considered the original author or authors, as Finland uses a Life+70 term, even for corporate copyrights, when an author can be identified. The name ...


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