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7

Copyright Your code, and the display it produces, is automatically protected by copyright the moment it is "fixed in a tangible form", which includes saving it in a computer file. In the US, a copyright notice has been optional since the effective date of the 1976 Copyright act, and in most other countries even longer. This is mandates by the ...


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A representation of a trademark is a term that generalizes a picture of it, to include trademarks that have some different medium such as 3D, color, smell, sound, etc. The registered particulars of the mark would be a description in words setting forth what is and is not claimed within a mark. For example, often a mark will claim words as they appear in a ...


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Both the displayed site (including all text and images) and the html, css, javascript and other code that generates the display are protected by copyright. This is true in pretty much every country. You would not be able to reuse them lawfully without permission, unless an exception to copyright applies. If no exception applies, and you have not obtained ...


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A phrase which is too generic or in too wide currnt use to be a valid trademark, may nevertheless be used as a business name or slogan. For example "Good Pizza" is so generic that I am reasonably sure that it could not be registered as a trademark, but a business could use that as a name or slogan. A business that did so would forgo any of the ...


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Trademarks can be held on dictionary words, shapes, colours, even scents; but they do not grant an absolute monopoly over that thing. They apply only: Within a defined class of goods or services When actively defended When a court judges that there was either deliberate "passing off", or a reasonable chance of confusion This BBC News article ...


2

Diesel, one of the examples in your question, has been an Italian clothing brand for decades. It's also the name of a couple of bands, couple of films, a game engine, a surname and the name of a military operation in 2009. Tornado, another one of your examples, is a community in West Virginia, the name of many amusement rides, the name of Zorro's horse, the ...


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Yes, but... Trademarks generally have a particular class of goods or services they apply to. For a common word such as "sky", a trademark will only be granted for a very narrow set; there's no chance of getting an "all purposes" trademark like you could for a made-up word. For example, VuongGiaNghi Nguyen holds a trademark to "Sky&...


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Yes Frequently referred to as a ‘badge of origin’, a trademark is a distinctive sign - usually a word or a symbol - that distinguishes your goods and services in the marketplace and helps consumers to identify them. Prominent trademarks that are dictionary words are Windows, Apple, Puma, (Ford) Focus, (Ford) Falcon, (Toyota) Sequoia, (Toyota) Highlander, (...


4

In the US at least, copyright does not normally protect titles and other short phrases, they are consider not original enough. However, titles, brand names, and slogans may be protected as trademarks, as may logos. A trademark is a word, phrase or symbol used to identify goods or services to customers and others. They key issue in a trademark case is might ...


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Even if "acme" were a currently active company with active trademarks, mentioning compatibility with another product is a classic example of nominative use and is not infringement unless a reasonable person would infer endorsement, support or approval. This does not sound like a valid reason to me. On the other hand, amazon can probably decide to ...


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