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2

In closing arguments, an attorney should only refer to evidence that was admitted at trial. In opening arguments, an attorney may refer to evidence that the attorney reasonably believes will be admitted at trial, and if the attorney has grounds to admit the transcript as an exhibit, could do so. If not, the attorney could still reasonable state: the ...


1

As pointed out in the other answer, hearings in the Supreme Court are live streamed and recorded. This has also occurred in the Court of Appeal (Civil Division) since November 2018. However, the hearings in these courts are not "trials." Ordinarily the open justice principle requires that the public be permitted to observe all court proceedings by ...


1

Yes, you can watch Supreme Court trials. You have three options: Access live videos of cases as they happen. Access recordings of hearings which have already taken place for current cases. Access recordings of cases which have already been decided. These will be some of the best cases you can possibly watch due to the fact that the Supreme Court is the ...


2

Suppose an individual is cited for a speeding infraction or served with a civil subpoena/complaint and fails to show up to court because at the same time the federal government deports the individual and as a result the individual cannot show up to a state court/trial. Does this individual have any recourse if a default judgement is entered against them? Or ...


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Yes In general, default judgements can be set aside for good cause. If the defendant can show that they had a legitimate reason for being unable to respond to the cause of action, then the judgement can be set aside and a new hearing scheduled. However, “good cause” encompasses things both unforeseen and unforeseeable and includes having good cause why the ...


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