We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

13

This is explicitly prohibited under 42 USC 2000e-2(c) (c)It shall be an unlawful employment practice for a labor organization— (1) to exclude or to expel from its membership, or otherwise to discriminate against, any individual because of his race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; (2) to limit, segregate, or classify its membership or ...


7

As discussed in this investopedia article contributions may be limited for Highly Compensated Employees (HCE). This article discusses the Actual Deferral & Actual Contribution Percentage Tests (ADP/ACP) which are used to determine limits for HCEs. However, in a unionized company, there can be other considerations . Union Bargaining agreements can ...


4

A. Yes it is clearly illegal to fire employees for unionizing. B. Companies get around this all the time by closing the facility. That means the managers lose their jobs too, which is incentive for management to keep a union from forming.


3

The credits following a recorded video performance are both customary in the industry, and are also required by union the union contract that applies when the production company is a union shop. These customs have not been static, however, and the history of this particular practice (without its underlying legal context) is discussed in a relevant Wikipedia ...


3

Put most simply: A "score" is the examination score for a job candidate who performed well enough to be considered for a position. It is more helpful to think of it as the candidate himself. "Certifying" a score mostly just means that the commission transmits the score to the hiring officer and promises that it's accurate. So whenever ...


3

There are 401k rules to prevent all the benefits going to the top people. That’s one of the reasons management provides broad incentives to participate. From IRS web site The top-heavy rules generally ensure that the lower paid employees receive a minimum benefit if the plan is top-heavy. A plan is top-heavy when, as of the last day of the prior plan year, ...


2

If you are interested in California law about education and labor unions, this page lists numerous laws relevant to public jobs and labor unions, the first entry being about collective bargaining and public schools. In general, it is legal for there to be a union which represents teachers and which negotiates with school boards on behalf of the members. No ...


2

The answer is yes, unions can be required to represent non-union employees, under certain circumstances. First, the union must be the exclusive representative of the employees. Exclusive means just what you think, they are the only ones allowed to bargain for the employees. Union occasionally chose to be non-exclusive, but this is rare. Second, it must ...


2

Your example is from 2.4(b)(1) of the style manual for "Commission and Agency Documents and Materials". The New York Public Employment Relations Board is a state level version of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) that governs private sector management-union relations nationwide, for public employees in New York State. These boards have both ...


1

It seems very unlikely that this scenario is legal. A press release from the EEOC in Feb. 2019 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) announced today that it has resolved its race discrimination lawsuit against the Jacksonville Association of Fire Fighters, Local 122, IAFF. The EEOC's lawsuit against the union was a ...


1

Illinois has a law governing strikes by public education employees. That law has various procedural requirements, and unfair labor practices by either side are prohibited. §16 allows an aggrieved party to apply for judicial review. In that case, the appellate court could order the strike to end (if there is a legal basis for that). That is, a judge can (...


1

The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned "closed shop" union agreements in the USA, which is where an employer agrees to only hire union members and only keep union members on the payroll. So, no. (though there are examples of unions that are effectively closed shop, and the Wikipedia article gives a few examples)


1

A person can report a breach of contract, if there actually is one: the risk is that they are mistaken and they make a false claim, in which case they may be sued for defamation. This would almost certainly fall under the rubric of defamation against public figure, where one must show "actual malice" (such as knowing that the claim is false, or having ...


1

It does not appear to me that such a case exists. A good overview of the issues is present at the Wikipedia post on the subject, whose supporting citation links have mostly rotted. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) denied the right of graduate students at private colleges to unionize in 2004 in a case involving Brown University which was reversed by ...


1

There is no law that requires the showing of credits for anything. Showing credits at the nod of a movie or TV show is customary but not required. Attribution of another person's work is a matter of the licence that that owner has given.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible