15

No. There's nothing in neither the Gambling Act 2005 nor the Police Regulations 2003 specifically preventing police officers from buying lottery tickets (or gambling in general for that matter). The principal requirement from the Police Regulations is at Schedule 1, para 1 which is to do it (like everything else in life) sensibly: A member of a police force ...


15

It seems like some law must have been breached during the sharing of this information? Possibly, even probably. The scrutiny of your personal account in order to glean personal data (your IP address) and then using that personal data to match accounts may contravene Recital 50 of the GDPR: The processing of personal data for purposes other than those for ...


8

It seems like some law must have been breached during the sharing of this information? No. A scrutiny of your pseudonymous account would reveal that you used it for advancing your own business interests. That use forfeits the protections for which the GDPR was intended. The Terms of Use very likely contain a provision to the effect of disclosing account ...


6

What happens to someone who’s committed a murder in the UK? Considering the person will be caught. This is a basic and somewhat vague question so I will provide a basic and very general answer. The name of the court with proper jurisdiction, the relevant criminal procedural rules, and the substantive law that applies varies within the U.K. In particular in ...


5

In principle, the data subject's right to access involves a copy of all personal data the controller holds on them. There are no time limits by default. Of course, the controller can ask a data subject to clarify their request, e.g. to focus on a particular time frame. There is an implied time limit though: personal data may only be processed/stored for as ...


4

Normally, the person who uses the electricity and pays for it is the "customer", that's you, not your landlord nor the maintenance company. Check out section 6.3.3 (A) of the MOCOPA agreement: the Distribution Business shall agree with the Customer or developer the position and space for the Metering Equipment, and shall, in so much as it is ...


3

You are probably an employee Answer these questions: Can you say “no” when the University offers you work? Or vice-versa, can they say “no” when you want to work? Can you subcontract the work? That is, can you hire someone to do what the University hired you to do? Do you control how and when you work? For example, when you break University rules are you ...


3

Schedules to an Act of Parliament are part of that act, and are no more or less important than any other part of the act. Broadly speaking, schedules are used for details and specifics, whereas the main body of the act is used for the actual legal framework and the like. This is helpful, as it avoids mixing two different types of content. (This is roughly ...


3

No. The police cannot determine if you have a lawful reason to know the details. Not their job. You can file your civil case using fictitious defendant name and then just apply for a court order to disclose who the guy actually is as part of the disclosure process. Provided that the court is satisfied you have a case, it will grant such order and the police ...


2

Under UK law, harassment requires at least 2 interactions So, a single WhatsApp message cannot be harassment, but 2 can be. So can 1 WhatsApp message and 1 phone call. Or 1 WhatsApp and an email. Or 1 WhatsApp and a letter. Or ... you get the idea.


2

Your rights are unaffected To be clear, your phone number of itself is personal data as defined in the GDPR. All you require to make a Data Access Request (DAR) is proof that it is your phone number. The recipient of your DAR is required to provide you with the data they have about you and: why they have it the categories of data they have who they’ve ...


2

Creditors have a limited time to make a claim against the estate Exactly how long depends on local law. If they are out of time, then they are not payable by the estate. If they are in time then they are payable by the estate or, if the executor distributed the assets too early, by the executor. The lease is an ongoing contract While it is quite common for ...


2

Probably not There are several independent legal relationships here: the contract between the landlord and the tenant the contract between the electricity retailer and the tenant (customer) the relationship between the landlord and the building owner the contract between the building owner and the management company The doctrine of privity means that a ...


2

Probably not There have not been many cases in this area of the law, and those have mostly dealt with "deep linking", particularly cases where a person knowingly linked to a page bypassing a login or introductory page, when the site was so designed that ordinarily a visitor could only get to other pages by going through such a log-in or intro page. ...


2

The names of such units are not protected by copyright, and never were. However their insignia would have been under Crown copyright See also Ministry of Defence Crown Copyright Licensing Information. Crown Copyright expires after 50 years for all published works, but lasts for 125 years after creation for unpublished works. Works obtained through archives, ...


2

Yes, R v Manning includes the following (my emphasis) We would mention one other factor of relevance. We are hearing this Reference at the end of April 2020, when the nation remains in lock-down as a result of the Covid-19 emergency. The impact of that emergency on prisons is well-known... The current conditions in prisons represent a factor which can ...


1

Yes, it’s possible The court doesn’t care where you live or what your nationality is, just that there is some nexus between your dispute and their jurisdiction. On the face of it, this could be brought in either country - this is a provincial matter in Canada and a national matter (England/Wales, Scotland, or Northern Ireland) in the UK. The procedural ...


1

I will answer this question by reference to the law of the United Kingdom, since you have added the relevant tag. Section 1 of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 provides: A person is guilty of forgery if he makes a false instrument, with the intention that he or another shall use it to induce somebody to accept it as genuine, and by reason of so ...


1

GDPR (Recital 64 Identity verification) says about this topic: The controller should use all reasonable measures to verify the identity of a data subject who requests access, in particular in the context of online services and online identifiers. A controller should not retain personal data for the sole purpose of being able to react to potential requests. ...


1

Only via the landlord. The building management provides services to either the building owner or the landlord (they may not be the same legal person e.g. the owner may just let a real estate agency run the building, or may only let them manage tenancies, or may manage tenancies themselves). The building management does not owe anything to you directly. One ...


1

Is this considered as harassment?   The offence is at s.1(1) of the Protection From Harassment Act 1997...  A person must not pursue a course of conduct— (a) which amounts to harassment of another, and (b) which he knows or ought to know amounts to harassment of the other. And s.7(3)(a) defines a "course of conduct" as... conduct on at least two ...


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