28

You can take action against the shop directly under the tort of nuisance. The available remedies are damages to compensate for interference with your property rights, and injunction to require the defendant to cease the activity which is causing the nuisance. You could also bring a judicial review action against the council if they refuse to investigate the ...


19

How can I take the issue further..? You can make a complaint, free of charge, to the independent Local Government & Social Care Ombudsman.


18

At common law, parliamentary privilege does not extend to the republication of words spoken in Parliament: Stockdale v Hansard (1839) 112 ER 1160. To overcome this, Parliament passed the Parliamentary Papers Act 1840, which provides absolute privilege for a report published “by or under the authority of either House of Parliament” (ie. Hansard). Section 3 of ...


16

The GDPR allows the right to access to be limited if this access would “adversely affect the rights and freedoms of others” (Art 15(4) GDPR). However, access to the recording would not give you more information than you've already received during the phone call, so this exemption is quite unlikely to apply in any case. UK data protection law also has a large ...


9

Anyone can claim asylum Whether that person qualifies as a refugee depends on the law in the country where they make the claim which usually involves an administrative decision making process. If a country is a signatory to the UN convention on refugees then local law will reflect that in some way. This outlines the process in australia. Under the convention ...


6

Can everyone name Soldier F now that an MP has? Possibly, for the following reasons: This Submission to the Joint Committee on Parliamentary Privilege states: The Speaker responded by reminding members that anything that was mentioned in the House was in the public domain, and that it was for the BBC to make up its own mind what to report... (I cannot yet ...


5

The relevant law in England and Wales is the Protection of Children Act 1978. Under section 1 of the Act, it’s a defense to distributing, showing, or possessing indecent images of children if you had a “legitimate reason” to distribute, show, or possess them. It’s also a defense if you had not seen the images, didn’t know they were indecent, and didn’t have ...


5

Simply being under an authoritarian government is not sufficient grounds for asylum. There are plenty of states in the world that restrict political activity where many people living there face no persecution. On the other hand, refugees can come from more "free" nations. Edward Snowden for example is a refugee from the United States.


2

Unfortunately, law lags behind STEM when it comes to open access research. BAILII and CommonLII are free legal research databases of material relevant to the UK, but they are sadly quite lacking in secondary material. On the other hand, the most authoritative source of UK law is the Supreme Court, and all of its judgments are searchable on BAILII. The ICLR’...


2

You can check in advance if you flee to Norway. On this page, you can select a country and they will give you a current policy statements (though individual circumstances may differ). US and UK are "generally safe", Russia and North Korea are not. As they say for the "safe country" page, your application for asylum will be processed and ...


2

does it mean that if I am caused an injury by a third party, receive sick pay, then subsequently claim the third party for loss of earnings, I must claim from them my full earnings and then return the sick pay to my employer? Yes. It is designed to prevent a double recovery. This kind of provision is common in casualty and health insurance contracts, where ...


2

Option one, Bob asks the newspaper to issue a correction. Should they refuse, or take an undue amount of time to issue the correction, or the correction is not as prominent as the original story (ie on at least the same page number and placement as the original story, not buried at the back of the paper), then Bob moves on to option two. Option two, ...


2

This will depend on the agreement between you and the business. Since you never had a written agreement, there would have to be an implied agreement. As the creator of the website, you would hold the initial copyright on that site, including its design. If yo wrote the text shown there, you would hold the initial copyright on that, also. (Under UK copyright ...


1

As pointed out in the comments and in cpast’s answer, it is a defence to a charge against s 1(1)(b) or (c) of the Protection of Children Act 1978 if the defendant proves that they had “a legitimate reason” for distributing, showing or possessing the material. As to whether “research” is “a legitimate reason,” the Crown Prosecution Service’s guidance for this ...


1

In a comment, you clarify your question thus: I am wondering if and how it would be possible for someone who did have a legitimate reason to access content that would otherwise be illegal. In another comment: say someone has a method that avoids that, and also has a legitimate reason to access illegal material. Does the law you linked to mean that it is ...


1

As pointed out in the other answer, hearings in the Supreme Court are live streamed and recorded. This has also occurred in the Court of Appeal (Civil Division) since November 2018. However, the hearings in these courts are not "trials." Ordinarily the open justice principle requires that the public be permitted to observe all court proceedings by ...


1

Yes, you can watch Supreme Court trials. You have three options: Access live videos of cases as they happen. Access recordings of hearings which have already taken place for current cases. Access recordings of cases which have already been decided. These will be some of the best cases you can possibly watch due to the fact that the Supreme Court is the ...


1

No, it’s not illegal It is legal to tell people where they can source information. For example, I can tell you that top-secret information on the UK's nuclear defence strategy is available from the Department of Defence. They won't give it to you if you don't have top-secret clearance and a need-to-know but there's no problem in me telling you that that's ...


1

The other answer sets out the general principles of disclosure in criminal cases. In the 42 cases dealt with in Hamilton v Post Office Ltd [2021] EWCA Crim 577, we also know “what actually did happen.” The Post Office’s failure to comply with its disclosure obligations caused the Court of Appeal to set aside the appellants’ convictions, even though most of ...


1

The law has changed in England and Wales since this answer was posted due to coming into force of the Tenant Fees Act 2019 on 1 June 2019. Section 1(1) provides a general prohibition on requiring a tenant to make a payment to a landlord. Section 2(1) extends the prohibition to letting agents. Section 3(1) provides that "for the purposes of this Act a ...


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