28

Notwithstanding the current COVID-19 regulations, I cannot find any Scottish law, regulation or rule that prevents a lawful tenant from having long-term visitors. However, it may (or may not) be a breach of the tenancy agreement depending on its terms which is where one should look for a definitive answer.


13

The purpose is to avoid the possibility that the solicitor will inadvertently end up providing advice to more than one side of the same dispute or transaction, putting the solicitor in a conflict of interest situation. In the simplest case, the solicitor might already represent the landlord that the tenant is seeking to discuss legal rights vis-a-vis. Even ...


11

This answer is an expansion on ohwilleke's answer, which explains that the reason probably involves avoiding conflicts of interest with other clients. The relevant provisions in england-and-wales are to be found in the Solicitor Regulation Authority's Code of Conduct for Solicitors, RELs, and RFLs which has statutory force by way of sections 31 and 32 of the ...


8

The rule applied by councils in the UK is that a person is not normally resident in a property if they have alternative accommodation in which they normally pay Council Tax. A certain amount of leeway is given for "guests" staying at a property, but broadly speaking, you need to let the council know that you have someone else staying in your house &...


7

You missed a bit: Unless, of course, the patient was a private patient and the doctor accepted half a guinea for his trouble: As well as the state-run National Health Service (which is generally free to most patients) the UK also has a number of private health care providers where patients pay, for example, to be treated sooner than they would if they went ...


5

The NHS system was introduced in the UK in 1948. I think Lord Devlin is referring mainly to the system before the NHS was introduced. Before 1948 doctors would charge patients a set fee for a consultation but if the patient was poor the doctor might decide not to accept a fee. Hence no consideration and so no contract. Although Lord Devlin is writing in 1963,...


4

There are two legal jurisdictions in the Channel Islands, the Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Bailiwick of Jersey. The law in Guernsey differs from the law in the UK partly because the Common Law developed differently (more Norman influence on Guernsey than on England) and partly because Guernsey and the UK have different legislatures and so pass different ...


4

Before getting into the technical answer to this question it is worth noting that when matters of a constitutional nature are involved then in practice it is not just a matter of a technical "legal" answer. Students and academics like to pose hypothetical questions such as "What would happen if the Queen refused assent to a Bill?" or &...


3

Generally, no Police cannot enter private property subject to a number of exemptions: they have a search warrant, or when in close pursuit of someone the police believe has committed, or attempted to commit, a serious crime, or to sort out a disturbance, or if they hear cries for help or of distress, or to enforce an arrest warrant, or if invited in freely ...


3

This practice is probably not illegal, but I think it is at best ethically dubious. The invoice specifies ""Advising in relation to employment agreement with X", but according to the question no advice about X was given or even asked for, and while advice about Y was discussed, no such advice was given. That suggests that the asker owes the ...


2

england-and-wales only Do the police have the capacity to compel an arrestee to not make a phone call, either with or without taking physical possession of the phone? Short Answer: At the time of arrest - yes Does the arrestee have the right to inform a third party of the arrest prior to complying with such a compulsion? Short Answer: No Long Answer: ...


2

All solicitors are required to have an internal complaints process, so if you have an issue with the service provided you should register a formal complaint with the firm. If that doesn't solve it, the next step is to go to the Legal Ombudsman - or to the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) if there's a suspected breach of their Code of Conduct. This link ...


2

You must do what you contracted to do You contracted to pay rent from Dec 2020, they contracted to provide housing from Dec 2020. They did provide the housing, the fact that you were unable to use it is your problem, not theirs. There is an exception if the the reason you can’t use it is due to some act or omission of theirs but that appears not to be the ...


2

Yes, they are significant transactions. For the purposes of Companies House, the company is not dormant. My answer does not address the position for HMRC. Section 1169 of the Companies Act 2006 provides (emphasis mine): (1) For the purposes of the Companies Acts a company is “dormant” during any period in which it has no significant accounting transaction. (...


1

Yes, those are significant transactions The fact that the net effect of all those transactions was zero is irrelevant. By the definition, the company has “not traded all of its costs and activities were “preliminary”.


1

The justices of the JCPC are mostly the same people as for the UK Supreme Court (formerly the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords) but legislation directs certain appeals to the JCPC rather than the UKSC where there are constitutional sensitivities which mean that the court needs to be seen as separate from the UK - most obviously appeals from courts ...


1

Talk to a lawyer Tell them what you want to happen and they will draft a will for you that makes sure what you want to happen does happen. They will also raise possibilities that you haven’t though of yet: like what if your sister pre-deceases you, or what if you have more than just this child when you die etc.


1

When does a threat become a crime? Short Answer: When it is an unreasonable request (i.e. a demand) that is unjustified in the circumstances (i.e. unwarranted) in order for someone to gain or lose something. Long Answer: I will only offer a general answer according to UK law as there is insufficient information in the Richard Barnard link (presumably as it ...


1

You didn't form a contract in the sense of a legal document stating your intentions and terms. Instead, you formed what the courts call an "implied in fact" contract, where your agreement to the terms is implied by your actions. You may not have believed you were agreeing to pay for anything, but contract law generally ignores evidence about what ...


1

A company pays tax on taxable profit That is, taxable revenue less tax deductible expenses. Not all revenue is taxable and not all expenses are tax deductible. Capital gains are also taxed differently from normal revenue. If the company invests in stocks (by which I assume you mean shares in publicly traded companies and not herds of cattle or flocks of ...


1

English law prohibits (in certain fields - e.g. employment) both direct and indirect discrimination in relation to a "protected characteristic". Protected characteristics include "race" (the definition of which includes colour, ethnicity, and national origins). An example of direct discrimination would be if you required an employee to be ...


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