8

Illinois has a "Castle Doctrine" which includes dwellings and other qualified buildings, but not a general "Stand your Ground" doctrine. Normally, to claim self-defense one has to show that they were not able to retreat and had to use force, but in Illinois you do not have a duty to retreat if you are preventing criminal interference ...


7

None of the above! What you describe almost never happens. That's not because statutes never contradict each other. Statutes contradict (or appear to contradict) each other all the time – lawyers take advantage of this, arguing the statute that seem to favor their client is the relevant one. What almost never happens is that a court finds that two statutes (...


5

It's not THAT easy, and it's fifteen years, not ten. As you say, Virginia requires your neighbors to do more than mow your lawn to get title to your land. In Virginia, most of these requirements are laid out in judicial decisions, not statutes. However, the one requirement set by statute is that the possessor has to have "possessed" the land for 15 ...


5

Welcome to LSE. Here are some answers to your question: No! It's not even close, but something like it is. The OSHA standard you cite is for mercury in the air in the workplace. You ask about "injections," which do not involve mercury in the air, so: this standard does not apply to injections. You ask about "injecting your employees with ...


4

No. Congress, in the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, gave the the power to regulate drugs to the FDA, not the President. In addition to giving the FDA jurisdiction, Congress also set up requirements and procedures that the FDA must use to classify and reclassify drugs. (The FDA, acting under the APA and other statutes, has engaged in further procedural ...


3

We cannot dispense personalized legal advice: that is what your attorney is for. However, I agree with your analysis that this is most likely covered by fair use, and indeed it is not obvious that you have taken anything that is protected. There is no creativity behind a number such as entries in the "I did N pushups" column. The arrangement of ...


3

The question is not firmly settled under Florida law. Wheeler v. State, 203 So. 3d 1007 addresses the issue w.r.t. Fla. Stat. §827.01(2), now §827.03(1)(a)3 and the crime of aggravated child abuse, which depends on causing "great bodily harm, permanent disability, or permanent disfigurement". The court notes that the chapter does not define "...


3

Is the agreement made by the seller binding? Yes. You "secured" reimbursement of 90% of what you paid and de facto waived your entitlement to the remaining 10%. Prior to that signing the agreement, you were entitled to be fully reimbursed regardless of how long it takes for the counterparty to sell the car to someone else. Depending on the exact ...


3

Keep in mind how that mechanism works. This question coming up isn't a longshot: it will definitely come up when the employee applies for unemployment benefits. The employer pays a fraction of unemployment benefits, so they have a stake. A termination for cause leaves the employee ineligible for unemployment benefits. The employee will file claiming they ...


3

It is possible that there is such a booklet in some jurisdiction, and that local police are required to carry that booklet and show it to persons on demand. This link (apparently) publicly provides the police manual for the city of Seattle, except it is 5 years and a major lawsuit out of date. No provision seems to exist that requires showing authority to ...


3

The most you can hope for is that is it very probably legal. Without author's permission, you will have literally violated copyright law. If you are sued, you have a defense available to you, namely "fair use". The problem with fair use is that it's a balancing act, but is it very probable that you would prevail primarily on the grounds that your ...


3

If they can compel you to show your insurance paper and you don’t want to unlock your phone to do that, then you need to bring it in paper form or suffer whatever consequences there are for not showing them. “Unlocking your phone” doesn’t mean you have to hand it over. Practice how to lock your phone quickly (iPhone: Press a specific button for four second), ...


3

Simply being confusing is not enough to make a contract unenforceable. The law generally operates on the premise that people can understand statutes, regulations and contracts, and that if they don't understand a contract, they won't agree to it. Therefore, if they agreed, they understood: this is a fundamental premise of contract law. However, there are a ...


2

The rule that all bills die when a Congress ends is an unwritten rule, based on precedent. It is part of a more general rule: All unfinished business dies when a Congress ends. The logic of this rule is simple: Because every member of the House is elected every term, every new Congress is considered a separate Congress. To require a new Congress to take up ...


2

An "idea" is not copyrightable, though the video itself is. There's nothing legally stopping you seeing a video about a villager apartment, for example, and making your own "How to make a villager apartment block" video. That said, some people will consider it unethical- provoke Youtube drama at your own risk. However, there are some ...


2

Are such legislative documents and papers admissible in court as evidence for the interpretation of the law? Such arguments are allowed if they are relevant although strictly speaking, they are not evidence. In other words, is legislative intent respected in US legal theory and court practice? Founder's Intent or Original Meaning is an accepted method of ...


2

No state can amend the US Constitution by itself. Technically, an amendment to the Constitution can be proposed a constitutional convention that is called for by two-thirds of the State legislatures (though this is has never happened; all 27 amendments have been proposed by the Federal Congress, which is the alternative path). This can be done without any ...


1

In the United States, neither the recording of the lawyer's conversation with a third party nor the lawyer's communications with an expert witness would generally be considered privileged. But that doesn't mean that the prosecutor can subpoena those records. The parties' rights to discovery of each other's evidence is spelled out in Fed. R. Crim. P. 16. That ...


1

Are lawyer conversations with third parties relevant to a case privileged? No. I'm assuming you ask about jurisdictions in the U.S. The attorney-client privilege does not extend to third parties. In the case of moral person (i.e., to distinguish from a physical person) the privilege covers communications employees and agents only to the extent that their ...


1

The ADA does not prohibit private entities from asking potential customers about disabilities. Title I, Section 102 (c) [Medical Examinations and Inquiries] puts limits on what an employer can ask potential employees. Title III, sections 301 through 310, which covers public accommodations and services operated by private entities, does not mention medical ...


1

You might be in trouble in New Jersey As a follow on to 6726's excellent answer, some states even have statutes that require many consumer contracts to be clear and understandable. For example, New Jersey law requires consumer contracts to be "easily readable." NJ courts have repeatedly used this statute to refuse to enforce confusing contracts. ...


1

The simple answer is, no. Standards for toxic and hazardous substances are here. Thiomersal is not listed, no injections into humans are regulated. It is impossible to compute the applicability of mercury regulations to your scenario because we'd have to know what the form of mercury is (read the regulations) and how much there is.


1

It is currently unknown exactly how this will play out. The law allows POTUS to prohibit transactions with Bytedance and subsidiaries, including Bytedance property (such as, their app). Evading the order, or conspiring to evade, is prohibited. The Sec'y of Commerce can promulgate regulations to implement the order. The restrictions would apply to all US ...


1

I agree with the other upvoted answers but would just like to add a bit of perspective. I've worked for several companies located in at-will states, and even though they have the right to terminate someone without providing a reason, in practice they have all tried very hard to document real performance shortcomings. This is because they are very aware that ...


1

Virginia state law imposes restrictions on possession and transportation of firearms and ammunition, §18.2-308.2. That law restricts those who have been convicted of a felony, as well as those committing certain juvenile offenses. Separate laws, 18.2-308.1:1 et seq, address purchase, possession, or transportation of firearms by persons in various "...


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