86

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

There is a state law that requires you to obey the police: ORC 2917.13, which says you may not Fail to obey the lawful order of any law enforcement officer engaged in the law enforcement officer's duties at the scene of or in connection with a fire, accident, disaster, riot, or emergency of any kind. If you do, misconduct at an emergency is a ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


20

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


15

I'm speculating a bit, but it is sometimes hard to distinguish a 'request' from an 'order' when dealing with law enforcement. Police might say "Can you open this door for us please?". But this can mean either "we would like you to open this door for us if you don't mind" or "we are ordering you to open this door, but in a polite way". I wold perhaps ...


6

Yes. In 1872 President Grant was stopped for speeding (on horseback, mind you). The officer, observing that he had stopped the President of the United States, initially let him go with nothing but a verbal warning. Later the same day, the same officer stopped Grant again speeding in the same place. The officer then informed Grant that he would have to be ...


5

Probably not In order to establish negligence as a Cause of Action under the tort of negligence, a plaintiff must prove that the defendant: had a duty to the plaintiff, breached that duty by failing to conform to the required standard of conduct (generally the standard of a reasonable person), the negligent conduct was the cause of the harm to the ...


4

Yes Probate law, consumer protection law and family law spring to mind.


4

As a former rental car employee I can explain why this is. Cars that are rented to customers for insurance reasons (accidents, etc) are supposed to match the size of the car that was damaged as close as possible. I'm speaking for one rental car company in particular here but I'm assuming others have a similar policy but every 2 years old the car is it goes ...


3

It's not odd to extradite people who are accused of crimes. The US has extradition treaties with many countries: see List of United States extradition treaties - Wikipedia. Extraditions are also recognized by international law: Extradition - Wikipedia As for El Chapo, the reason for his extradition is The decision to extradite Mr. Guzmán was an about-...


3

Wife was an RA at a women's college. I'm seeing this from two perspectives... 1) the police / fire are just human beings like you and me. They're not infallable. There may be a single set of keys, and the person responding might not have them. But, if the officer or fire personel are responding to an emergency, then they do need access. Facilitating their ...


3

The copies of the photo that you gave to him continue to be his. He is allowed to keep them, and there is probably no way that you could legally compel him to delete or destroy them. Unless the pictures can be classified as "hardcore pornography," they are within the ambit of First Amendment protection. I don't see -- and the article doesn't explain -- how ...


3

I assume these are digital photos that were electronically transferred (not prints physically delivered). If they were prints physically delivered, he owns those prints, since you used to own them but you unconditionally transferred ownership to him by giving them. No backsies under the law. The photos are protected by copyright law, which means that the ...


2

To be convicted of murder all that is needed is some proof beyond reasonable doubt that the defendant committed murder. That proof can be made of any evidence, and that does not necessarily need to include the body. The killer could have dissolved the body in acid and flushed down the toilet, or kicked it out of a plane above Mount Everest (or Mariana ...


2

I believe it refers to the fact that some earphones are built in such away that they hook over the top of the ear (a common feature in earphones designed for fitness as those without the hook may become loose) or a feature where the speaker can swing away from the ear for better listening to a person. Additionally, it is entirely possible to not have ...


1

Yes Children can be (and are) required to give evidence in courts all over the world including the USA. There are generally special rules in place to protect them such as by using video link and not allowing aggressive cross-examination. They may or may not be sworn and the court usually investigates that the child understands the difference between truth ...


1

As you can see in this well-known chart, unpublished works have a US copyright term of 70 years after the author's death. Thus the original would be in the public domain if the author (photographer) died before 1949, but still under copyright if the death date is 1949 or later. If the date of the author's death is not known, copyright lasts for 120 years ...


1

Derivative works are separate works with distinct copyright terms For your example, the derivative is public domain, the original is under copyright until 70 years after the photographer's death.


1

It's not just legal, but often (depending on the state/county) legally required, otherwise they would be considered 'negligent' in helping providing a minor with alcohol, which can get them in jail.


1

The Military Law of the United States is collected in the Uniform Code of Military Justice and has Jurisidicition over all military service members including reserves, the Coast Guard in times of peace (when it is not part of the Department of Defense but instead DHS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Public Health Service Corp (...


1

The case of Hans Reiser springs to mind. From Wikipedia: Reiser was convicted of the first-degree murder of his wife, Nina Reiser, who disappeared in September 2006. He subsequently pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of second-degree murder, as part of a settlement agreement that included disclosing the location of his wife's body, which he revealed to be ...


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