20

Legal question, statistical (economic) answer. You need to evaluate the expected value of an outcome which is the sum of the product of probability of winning and the gain (or loss) from winning and the product of the probability of losing and the gain (or loss) from losing. As a mathmatical expression: Expected value = [P(winning) x gain] - [P(losing) x ...


8

A problem is that statistical "expectation" answers (percentage chance x value) are not a value one may expect to receive. They are a value which on average may be expected if there were repeated events. For a lawyer, with many clients and cases, an accurate expectation will suggest how they can maximise their overall case wins. But its a lot less clear ...


5

I know this is not what you've asked (I will get to that too), but I figured I would take the opportunity to state that the owner of the well cannot send you an invoice for the water unless you agreed to a price and entered into a binding agreement. They cannot just decide their water is worth X and then tell you that the amount is due. Just as you cannot ...


5

Is there a rule of thumb for determining the amount one should accept for of a settlement offer? No. It is entirely up to the injured party to decide how much he is willing to irreversibly give away in a settlement. The party should crunch numbers to ascertain the actual amount he would receive after expenses (first and foremost, attorney fees, if he is ...


2

You could offer to sell your own consent to use your records to a healthcare provider, and collect if the provider agreed. But that wouldn't make you a "broker" as I see it, only a one-tiem seller. To be a broker you would somehow have to convincew many others to let you act as their agent in selling such consent to various providers,at some sort of ...


2

B owns the pump. There was no transfer of ownership of the pump from B to A, so B owns it. If A thinks B is liable for some obligation to A, then A's recourse is to sue B for damages and/or specific performance of the terms of the contract. In this case, if B can not access the pump B owns, B's recourse is to sue A for damages and/or return of the pump. ...


2

Some arguments hold that "unjust factors" has founded on a vague conceptualization of unjust enrichment situations, as occurs at the beginning of all areas of practice. "Absence of basis" reasoning presents a specific condition by which determination can occur. A 'basis' can exist, or not, and when present the basis derives from rights that – ideally – ...


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