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1

The drafters of the Constitution and Bill of Rights did seem to wield commas like blunt instruments to smash into sentences (see the 2nd Amendment). The intention is clear if the comma after 'United States' is taken out: "No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be ...


3

The true answer is this is fundamentally unclear and ratification would definitely set up for a Supreme Court showdown. The Supreme Court would in my opinion need to resolve 3 issues: Are Congressionally imposed deadlines in resolutions proposing an amendment to the States for ratification binding? Does a state withdrawal of its ratification of an ...


-1

So yes, the combination of the deadline and the withdrawl of support would mean that the 75%+ threshhold has yet to be crossed by whatever deficit is required (where there three more states needed, prior to the sunset and repeals of approval? Or would the two states that passed recently plus Virginia close that gap? Your math is rather fuzzy in how many ...


-1

As the Wikipedia entry says, the Constitution does not say whether a state can rescind it's ratification. No one can say otherwise until the matter goes to court, if it does. Whether that counts would ultimately be up to a judge.


5

This is technically an open question, but there is a general consensus that Consovoy's argument is unprecedented and unsupportable. If the president can be dragged into civil litigation over private matters in the middle of his presidency, Clinton v. Jones, 520 U.S. 681 (1997), it seems unlikely that the courts would give him a pass on prosecution for a ...


4

It probably does, up to a point. Roe v. Wade asserts a right to privacy, discussed in §VIII. Granting that there is no explicit enumeration of a right to privacy in the Constitution, its implicit presence is discerned via a long series of constitutional rulings of a diverse nature. It is not clear what is the extent of This right of privacy, whether it be ...


1

The question is very simple: It is short, but not simple. Often short, seemingly simple questions have the most complex answers. The First Amendment itself has only 45 words governing six separate rights. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, ...


1

United States v. Verdugo-Urquidez, 494 US 259 (1990), holding that the Fourth Amendment does not "appl[y] to the search and seizure by United States agents of property that is owned by a nonresident alien and located in a foreign country," may have shed some light on this issue (while by no means this is conclusive on the issue of First Amendment protection ...


4

Speech of foreign nationals is not treated the same as that of citizens. In the case Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, the Supreme Court rules on the constitutionality of various statutory limits on campaign spending. Some parts of the law were upheld, others were overturned in 1st Amendment grounds. They upheld limits on contributions to candidates and ...


0

Notice that when a president is sworn in, he takes an oath to "preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution." And as far as being special in any way is concerned, notice that It can be altered only with ratifications of three-fourths of the states, and The supreme law of the land is the Constitution and the laws enacted by Congress exercising power ...


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