97

Trespassing requires that you be on someone else's property without their permission. The supervisor has explicitly given you permission, so it's not possible for you to trespass. You are correct that someone with the proper authority could revoke this permission at any time, at which point you would have to leave or be guilty of trespassing. The only way ...


24

No A state may not do that. The US Constitution Art. I section 8 says: The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States. ... To ...


21

US Laws are Free of Copyright Federal Works 17 USC 105 says: Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government, but the United States Government is not precluded from receiving and holding copyrights transferred to it by assignment, bequest, or otherwise. The phrase "work of the United States Government"...


15

if a postal police officer happened to be there one day, he'd [...] question the supervisor I'd say the post office people, and esp. the supervisor, are at much higher risk than you. If, by some policy or law or whatever, what you do was actually prohibited, then the supervisor and staff would likely get into trouble for allowing you there because it ...


8

So a little background will help. the United States Code has only been around since 1926 where before the law was a patchwork of acts. Over time congress has taken a bundle of acts and relegated them to be covered by a title in the code. This project is still on going with legislation for Title 52 and Title 54 passing in 2014. Title 53 is a work in progress ...


8

I agree with David Siegel's answer but I think its always important in the law to consider what it would take to get what you want. I will say it is possible but not as an export prohibition per se and practically may fail. The state could use its 5th amendment powers of eminent domain to take possession of all of the desired raw materials and relevant ...


7

They can, and do; there's just one wrinkle: They get the assent of the Federal government. Take the Great Lakes Compact (please, says Nestle and Coke). It's a deal amongst the Great Lakes border states, and provinces, that decide how (or to be more precise, how not) water will leave the Great Lakes watershed. It's an agreement, not a treaty. But as ...


7

Your interpretation is correct. The constitution says that judges stay in office "until and unless they are impeached." That means that congress cannot impose a time limit on any judge's term of office. If it did so, it would be contrary to the constitution. The only grounds for removal are those to do with misbehavior. Therefore, judges have life ...


6

Mueller was appointed under Title 28 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 600, which provides at § 600.8(c), Closing documentation, that At the conclusion of the Special Counsel's work, he or she shall provide the Attorney General with a confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions reached by the Special Counsel. The use of ...


6

Yes. In 1872 President Grant was stopped for speeding (on horseback, mind you). The officer, observing that he had stopped the President of the United States, initially let him go with nothing but a verbal warning. Later the same day, the same officer stopped Grant again speeding in the same place. The officer then informed Grant that he would have to be ...


6

When an individual or an organization (such as a business or a local or state government) thinks that a governmental action is in violation of a constitutional limitation, s/he/it may file suit against the government (Federal, state, or local as the case may be). Such suits most often seek injunctions against continuation of the action, but sometimes damages,...


6

There are some statutes that have a section that says "any violation of this action is punishable by . . . ." but the INA is not one of them. Generally speaking, the way it would be imposed would be: (1) to deny entry on a departing commercial airplane flight or ship (which is enforced by the private enterprises involved pursuant to Transportation ...


5

Employees are only required to work in the sense that refusal to report can result in discipline (like reprimand or firing) and forfeit of whatever money you would have earned had you shown up. This is exactly the same way federal employees (or most employees, for that matter) are always required to work. The fact that they're not being paid on time has ...


4

If someone was charged with 15 counts of a crime but was only indicted on 2 counts, can the prosecutor introduce evidence at sentencing of charges that the person was not indicted on? In federal court, yes. This has been the case since Williams v. New York, 337 U.S. 241 (1949) which held that evidence such as counts and conduct upon which the defendant ...


4

5 CFR 2635.102 provides definitions for 5 CFR Part 2635 (which contains 5 CFR 2635.502). (h) Employee means any officer or employee of an agency, including a special Government employee. It includes officers but not enlisted members of the uniformed services. It includes employees of a State or local government or other organization who are serving ...


3

This is basically a separation of powers issue. Mueller was operating under the authority of the head of the Justice Department, which is under the executive branch of government. Mueller is not authorized to give copies to the public, give it to Congress, to the Supreme Court, the media, or anyone else, other than his superior. The investigation was ...


3

If a farmer had recently built a barn (within the past year) that cost 45,000 dollars (paid for from a loan), on a piece of property that was originally 10,000 dollars(not paid for from a loan), but the market only values the property with the barn at 35,000 dollars, is the government only responsible for paying the market value if they decide to ...


3

No. Reason: Taxes are not a contract for specific services, so even if the government did nothing for you in return for your taxes, you do not have recourse to a rebate for "breech of contract." The only recourse is political. Theoretically if the government failed to provide a service that was required by law or Constitution, there could be legal action to ...


3

1a - Where is US government website where person can requesting free copy of their MIB (online or by phone). And I don't mean MIB.com. I am looking for government website that would reference something like MIB, i.e. for instance Federal Trade Commission website references annualcreditreport.com There isn't one. The right to medical information is ...


2

At 17 USC 105, works of the US government are explicitly excluded from copyright protection: Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.... The phrase "work of the United States Government" is defined at 17 USC 101 thus: A “work of the United States Government” is a work prepared by an officer ...


2

There is a "Final rule" on this subject, posted in several place's, including here and here. The full text of the rule will appear in the Federal Register, but it is apparently not posted yet. The posted text says: The final rule clarifies that the definition of “machinegun” in the Gun Control Act (GCA) and National Firearms Act (NFA) includes bump-stock-...


2

According to CENDI, yes the US government is able to claim copyright on works internationally. The law in question which makes US government works public domain in the US (17 U.S. Code § 105) only does so within the confines of US copyright. Since copyright protection is on a per-country basis, there's no reason that the US government couldn't assert IP ...


2

They can be ordered to pay a civil penalty, fined, or imprisoned. 52 USC 30116 (a) (1) (A): Except as provided in subsection (i) and section 30117 of this title, no person shall make contributions— to any candidate and his authorized political committees with respect to any election for Federal office which, in the aggregate, exceed $2,000; (The amount ...


2

Push comes to shove, the government can get away with paying a defensible fair market value, so the theoretical answer is "you get $35,000 and you owe the bank". But the practical answer is if the government lets push come to shove, they suck at eminent domain. Land acquisition has an overhead cost. That cost is considerable. If everyone plays their ...


2

No. As it is an interstate transaction, the applicable laws of sales are the Federal Laws, which still classify it as an illegal substance, and thus, will prosecute for charges related to interstate sales. In so far as I am aware, all cannabis grown for consumption (as opposed to other utilities, like Hemp rope and oils, which I'm fuzzy on the legal ...


2

According to this Wall Street Journal report, Huawei is suing the "U.S.". What does this really mean? Are they suing the entire U.S. government, a branch of the U.S. government, the people of the U.S., or something else? This means that he is either (1) suing the United States government as an entity, or (2) a federal government official, in ...


2

Yes Contempt of court is an example, I’m sure there are others.


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