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To build up on the the user6726's answer above, if someone in that crowd took the extra steps which caused the police to believe that there was a threat to life (eg, by yelling something threatening like "kill em all"), then they possibly provoked the shooting. The individuals who did provoke it could conceivably be guilty of mayhem. And, ...


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There are several treason and sedition crimes in federal law all of which are defined by statute. Treason Offenses Treason offenses pertain to acts in furtherance of a foreign country or sometimes more specifically a foreign country with which the United States is at war (which is the legal definition of an "enemy"). These include Sections 2381, ...


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Not under federal law, where the enumerated felonies are arson, escape, murder, kidnapping, treason, espionage, sabotage, aggravated sexual abuse or sexual abuse, child abuse, burglary, or robbery. Under DC law, the triggering felony may be arson...first degree sexual abuse, first degree child sexual abuse, first degree cruelty to children, mayhem, robbery, ...


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This may be what youre thinking of: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/41/3307


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Short Answer No. The immigration applicant is generally not entitled to his or her attorney fees in this situation, even though the government is violating one of its own laws. Long Answer The Black Letter Law Question The Right To Fees Depends On The Legal Theory Advanced A consistent answer doesn't exist at the level of generality of the title question. ...


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Yes and No. The Federal U.S. Government as well as each individual state and territory claim Soverign Immunity to a limited degree. In the case of Federal Government, they claim Soverign Immunity to a near limitless degree (more on this in a moment), while States and Territories claim "State Soverign Immunity" which grants them immunity with ...


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