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17

Generally not. Federal court uses a principle known as the enrolled bill rule -- in deference to the coequal status of the three branches of government, the "enrolled bill" (the thing printed on fancy paper that actually went to the President for signature) is irrebuttable evidence that the law was properly passed. The courts cannot deal with inquiries into ...


15

Nothing will happen. Wait for the 2030 census and January 3rd 2033. Representatives are only recalculated after each census. The last census and recalculation was 2020. So no ordinary recalculation will happen till 2030. It's unclear if there could be an extra census, which then might lead to redistricting - the only rules (in the constitution) I can find ...


9

We have a recent real-life example of this sort of scenario. Hurricane Katrina caused massive depopulation of Louisiana's 2nd Congressional District. At the time, this district was mostly the City of New Orleans, as well as a small portion of Jefferson Parish. (The City of New Orleans is a consolidated city-parish, and so is referred to as Orleans Parish ...


3

House Rule XI(m), p. 19, states the power of committees and subcommittees to issue subpoenas. (1)…a committee or sub-committee is authorized (subject to subparagraph (3)(A)) …to require, by subpoena or otherwise, the attendance and testimony of such witnesses… (3)(A)(i) Except as provided in sub-division (A)(ii), a subpoena may be ...


3

There is a legal doctrine of executive privilege, where the executive branch can resist subpoenas, but that privilege is limited (US v. Nixon). Neither the doctrine of separation of powers nor the generalized need for confidentiality of high-level communications, without more, can sustain an absolute, unqualified Presidential privilege of immunity ...


2

The only legal requirement for bill origination is that tax bills must originate in the House of Representatives. Otherwise, simultaneous origination is quite common. Differences are resolved through a process called "reconciliation" prior to passage.


2

Under 2 U.S. Code § 2a, (a) On the first day, or within one week thereafter, of the first regular session of the Eighty-second Congress and of each fifth Congress thereafter, the President shall transmit to the Congress a statement showing the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed, as ascertained under the seventeenth and each ...


2

Here is a little bit on different methods, and Wikipedia says that this is the Huntington-Hill method being the currently employed one. Here is the statute, 2 USC 2a, which requires using "the method known as the method of equal proportions", which is not statutorily defined. Here is the original act of Congress. This document from the Census ...


2

How does one determine who gets "fired"? By holding an election. Redistricting always affects the next congress, not the current one, and the entire house of representatives is up for reelection every two years. After a reduction in representation, at least two incumbents will be in the same district. If they both seek to be reelected, they will ...


1

W.r.t. the House of Representatives, the matter is disposed of in 2 USC Ch 12, on contested elections. §283 allows the contestant to serve notice of contest on the putative winner, and he must "within thirty days after the result of such election shall have been declared by the officer or Board of Canvassers authorized by law to declare such result, ...


1

Due Process is for defendants: The "fairness" provisions in Amendments 4-8 do not "typically" apply to defendants. They explicitly apply only to defendants. For instance, the 5th Amendment says: No person shall...be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law... The basic idea is that the public is best served by having a fair,...


1

The legal consequence of ratifying this amendment is that it would become the 28th Amendment to the US constitution. That simply means that there would be a number of elections with lots of election maps re-drawn. Also, the Capital building would likely have to be enlarged to accommodate more representatives. Since ratification laws are based on the ...


1

The senate can change their rules at any time by a majority vote. 60 (3/5) votes are required to end a filibuster (with the exceptions of federal judge nominees (1/2) and rule change motions (2/3)). So, for your hypothetical to occur, there needs to be an intermediate step where a majority agrees to change the rules to allow a simple majority to cloture the ...


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