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None. Putting something on a piece of land long term and prohibiting anyone to move it is effectively occupying that piece of land. You only can occupy land that you either have legal rights to, or that encounters no objection from those who has (adverse possession). In the latter case, it's not that you don't "provide them right to tow", rather ...


1

I second ohwilleke's succinct analysis, and would like to support it from at least the warranty angle under a reading of the U.C.C. in California: “It is important to note . . . that even statements of opinion can become warranties under the code if they become part of the basis of the bargain.” (Hauter v. Zogarts (1975) 14 Cal.3d 115, fn. 10 [120 Cal.Rptr. ...


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A U.S. auto manufacturer promises in writing that its vehicles will, for the life of their vehicles, receive free hydrogen at its charging stations. . . . The written promise was related to the workmanship of the vehicle in connection with its software and hardware components. Was a warranty created? It sounds like there were two separate promises. A ...


1

Delta (which appears to be Cobb's liability insurance company) has no obligation to pay Bob's claim promptly or to respond to Bob. Bob's remedy is to sue Cobb for sideswiping his car within the statute of limitations (three years for property damage without personal injuries in an automobile accident in California) for doing so. Delta's obligation is to Cobb....


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A U.S. auto manufacturer promises in writing that its vehicles will, for the life of their vehicles, receive free hydrogen at its charging stations. Was a warranty created? No, and it creates no obligation to provide maintenance for free either. The exact wording of the writing might make a difference, but the promise of free hydrogen does not imply a ...


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