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29

Questions about being barred from entry into the UK 10 years down the road need to be asked some number of years in the future. Current practice is that the Home Secretary does not bar entry because of an unpaid debt, instead you have to do something egregiously bad or antisocial. Given Brexit, future matters of immigration are not set in stone. One ...


23

All laws (federal, state and local) apply to everybody, unless you have diplomatic immunity. That is, unless e.g. the federal government decides as a matter of policy to ignore certain federal laws. California does not have a law generally prohibiting the use of marijuana, though public consumption is illegal, minor consumption is illegal, and possession ...


8

only federal law applies to foreigners This is not correct. For example, there is no federal law criminalizing murder generally. (There are federal laws criminalizing murder in certain specific circumstances.) If you killed the shopkeeper around the corner, you probably would not have violated any federal law. You will of course be subject to ...


6

If you falsely claim to be a US citizen in order to obtain work, vote in a US election, or receive public benefits in the United States, you can be deported, lose a green card, or be banned from ever obtaining a green card or US Visa. See https://dyanwilliamslaw.com/2015/02/why-lying-about-being-a-u-s-citizen-can-stop-you-from-becoming-a-permanent-resident-...


5

You got an entry stamp, not a visa stamp. A US visa (aka "visa stamp") is a physical sticker that you have to go to a US consulate to apply for, which takes up one page of your passport and says "US Visa" on it. Canadian citizens do not need or get US visas to travel to the US for most types of nonimmigrant statuses, including as a visitor. US citizens are ...


4

You will probably not be allowed to enter the United States if your visa is expired. Sometimes foreign student advisors at a college or an immigration attorney will know how to expedite the process to get it renewed in time. Also, sometimes the offeror of a scholarship can move it back to accommodate your inability to get a timely visa renewal, assuming ...


4

It is discrimination. However, it is legal, and generally not grounds for a lawsuit. Discrimination is legal, except when it is based upon certain specific categories, such as race, sex, and religion. For example, it is perfectly legal to discriminate for a position based on the possession of education degrees, skill certification or availability to work ...


4

This is a tricky question on the intersection of visa and tax laws. It is tricky because every country can make its own rules that apply when you are in that country or do business in that country. Even within the EU, there is no uniform approach because freedom of movement merely covers the right to work in a country, but not the rules which have to be ...


3

If the purported husband (PH) has not attempted to enter the UK under false pretenses, and has not submitted documents containing false statements to the UK government, it is hard to see how he might be charged with a crime by the UK in connection with the invalid marriage. But since the PH is now said to have submitted an application for entry clearance ...


3

It's important to be clear about what you mean by "benefit," but if you're truly obtaining no legally cognizable benefit, then a lie about citizenship status is protected by the First Amendment. The government may not use it as the basis to take any action against you. Under U.S. v. Alvarez, 567 U.S. 709 (2012), the fact that speech is false is not enough ...


3

New Zealand has ratified the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment of Punishment and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. You must submit a request in writing and the Refugee Status Branch processes the claim. While yopur claim is being processed, ...


3

Less than zero dollars. An undertaking like this is usually categorized as either a hobby or a business. The official guidance is in IRS Publication 535, but a determinination takes into account lots of different factors, such as: how much time and effort goes into the undertaking; whether the taxpayer relies on the income for basic expenses; whether the ...


3

According to the Common Questions you have 30 days to leave the country after your program is over. However, this implies that you may not work unless you have obtained an extension to your program. The answer that you quote seems to mean that if your visa expires but the original program is still continuing, then you can stay. Otherwise you have to leave ...


3

Is it legal to cross the channel in a private rowing boat or sailing boat? Yes. Can he land on any old beach, or does he have to go to a port to identify himself? It depends. Who is on board, where did they come from, what have they got in their pockets, etc. This may be helpful Notice 8: sailing your pleasure craft to and from the UK When ...


3

As far as your visa is concerned, both, France and Germany are in the Schengen area, so a visa in one of those countries will give you access to both. As for as your work permit is concerned, at least in Germany you will need some participation of your new employer. They will have to prove that they can find nobody else in the EU. So they'll probably want ...


3

Not before the transition period ends (31 December 2020): During this period, the UK will remain in both the EU customs union and single market. That means, until the transition ends, most things will stay the same. This includes: Travelling to and from the EU (including the rules around driving licences and pet passports) Freedom of ...


3

They must apply for an extension of the visa: you can read about the UCIS covid-19 response here. The application must be "timely", so this should be done now. Even though the extension will probably be pending for some time, if the application is filed in a timely fashion, which puts off unlawful presence status. Also read about "Special circumstances".


2

For most grounds of inadmissibility, most nonimmigrants are actually entitled to a hearing before an immigration judge before being removed from the US. See 8 CFR 235.3(b)(3): (3) Additional charges of inadmissibility. In the expedited removal process, the Service may not charge an alien with any additional grounds of inadmissibility other than section 212(...


2

The short answer is "no." The executive branch has broad discretionary authority to make a border entry refusal even if someone's paperwork is in order under immigration law. I don't have the chapter and verse of the authority in hand, but basically there is not a legally enforceable right of a non-citizen to enter enforceable under non-immigration law, ...


2

Let me start off by quoting Wikipedia on Guadeloupe: Guadeloupe, like the other overseas departments, is an integral part of France. As a constituent territory of the European Union and the Eurozone, the euro is its official currency and any European Union citizen is free to settle and work there indefinitely. As an overseas department, however, it is not ...


2

You were refused entry at a Schengen border control point because you intended to work but did not have the proper documentation to work. In order to work in the EEA you need to be an EEA national or have a work permit issued by one of the member states. So you returned to your home country and filed a proper application which was refused... I did and ...


2

The question is not if the airline is wrong, the question is if they are negligent If the airline has a reasonable belief that the trip is unlawful then they are within their legal obligations to stop Bob boarding. In arriving at their belief, providing they acted within the law and their own policies and made reasonable enquires within the time constraints, ...


2

Probably No. To the extent that the airline is enforcing immigrations laws, it is likely doing so at the direction of a government official or government regulations, or sometimes as an actual agent of the government. Essentially, in the first instance, the airline would have an illegality defense to a claim for breach of contract. An airline can't be ...


2

All the laws apply to you. But you have extra rules: the conditions of your visa. Non-citizens are present at the pleasure of the government, and the big four they don't want (unless visa allows) are overstaying the visa, seeking employ, using public support, and committing crimes. You also have an extra consequence: refusal on your next attempt to ...


1

I don't think the 2-year home residency requirement prevents the child from naturalizing under the INA 322 process. However, this naturalization process also requires that the child be regularly residing abroad; I am not sure if your child would meet that, though a J-1/J-2 should be considered to be intending to return to residence abroad.


1

Congrats. This is a better question for expats. But basically you’d get married, file an I-130 marriage petition, and once that is given, file for a green card. It’ll cost you at least a thousand in filing fees, so you could hire a lawyer to help you make sure your paperwork is correct.


1

A defendant does not have to attend trial in a civil case. Your lawyers can run your defence without you. The court will make reasonable efforts to allow you to attend if you want to but if you can’t or won’t (for whatever reasons) the plaintiff has a right to their day in court without you. In a criminal trial, you will be detained (by immigration ...


1

What code will specify the consequence? 8 USC 911, false personation of a US citizen. As noted in other answers, the circumstances you describe suggest that free speech considerations would protect you from conviction. am I removable? Similarly, as noted in another answer, inadmissibility and deportability are triggered if the lie was for the purpose ...


1

When a foreigner marries a US citizen in the US, the foreigner's immigration status does not change. So you will be able to remain in the US in J-1 status just as if you hadn't married a US citizen.


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