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13

According to New York law ELN § 17-142: Except as allowed by law, any person who directly or indirectly, by himself or through any other person: 1. Pays, lends or contributes, or offers or promises to pay, lend or contribute any money or other valuable consideration to or for any voter, or to or for any other person, to induce such voter or other ...


6

The 24th Amendment states: Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll ...


5

Yes, so long as you are still a US citizen, it does not matter if you no longer maintain residence in the United States. If you no longer have any sort of residence that can be claimed as a current residence, you simply register at whatever the last residence you used was when you lived in the United States (even if someone else lives there now). You would ...


4

Although the constitution doesn't explicitly require your vote to be equal in strength, surely the founders intended with the word 'vote' that you at least get to choose who you vote for. Quite the contrary. The founders specifically intended that smaller states should have disproportionate strength - they knew exactly what they were doing. This was one ...


4

with the new movement by some states to require voters to have identification to vote, and the fact that no state I know of provides free government issued ID (unless you are an employee) it seems that unless a state provided its residents with free access to state-issued ID, that requiring people to go pay for ID's needed to vote would be contrary ...


3

People make mistakes. My assessments come with information on how to dispute them, and if yours don't you should be able to get that information. File a dispute or whatever it is you do to challenge the assessment. Include the information about you being outside the district and not having he measure on your ballot. If you're just outside the district, ...


3

Taxes are not defined in the US Constitution nor as a general term by any federal statute, but a tax is considered to be a government assessment on property and transactions (e.g. import, sale, transfer of property), assessed to defray the cost of running a government. Governments also charge fees for specific services. Stemming from Proposition 218, ...


3

In National Federation Of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the court addressed the matter of withholding funding, with respect to obligatory expansion of Medicaid, where ACA required states to expand Medicaid coverage, or lose all federal Medicaid funds. The effect, as described in the ruling was "[t]he threatened loss of over 10 percent of a State’s ...


3

Since electors are in fact free to vote for whoever they want (though don't usually deviate from their assignment), the branch of federal government that would be most involved is Congress. A constitutional amendment would be required, to repeal Article II Section 1 Clauses 2 and 4 and the 12th Amendment (i.e. eliminate electors entirely), and substitute a ...


3

It depends on the rules of the particular betting market and the laws under which it operates. Assuming that the bet itself is legal, it is not uncommon that participants in the contest are not allowed to bet, not because they distort the market, but because they can influence the outcome. Consider if instead of betting to win, Mr Trump bet on himself to ...


2

Have a look at https://www.fvap.gov/citizen-voter. The rules vary slightly from state to state, but chances are good that you can vote in the state where your parents last lived in the US. If you were born in the US, then it looks like you can vote in the state where you were born even if you didn't live there or even stay there for very long. However, it'...


2

According to Texas law, Election code 61.014(b): A person may not use any mechanical or electronic means of recording images or sound within 100 feet of a voting station. However, the punishment appears to be only this: The presiding judge may require a person who violates this section to turn off the device or to leave the polling place.


2

About half the states have some law against faithless electoring. It turns out that the existing laws are toothless since they are not enforced but it's also not clear how often those laws have been put to the test. In Minnesota, the elector's ballot is invalidated and a random alternate is selected (except if the presidential candidate has died or become ...


2

A person should register to vote in their state of residence. Aka the state where they claim to be a resident. Unfortunately, residency is defined by the individual states and the definitions aren't consistent. Even more unfortunate is that the state where a person is registered to vote is often used as a criteria in determining a person's state of ...


2

The law usually applies the "common use meaning" of a word when interpreting it. Generally speaking, when used by itself, the term "majority" implies a simple majority: "more than half of the votes". Mathematically it would be ">50% of votes" Since that is the common meaning of the word majority, then unless context dictates otherwise, the term majority ...


2

Authorizing someone else to vote on your behalf (either at your direction or at their own discretion is called Proxy Voting. It is extremely common in elections within corporations and other organisations; it is extremely rare in governmental elections. Each state of the US determines the rules governing voting so there is no blanket answer. For California ...


2

First a point of terminology, Ranked Choice Voting (or Ranked Voting) refers to any of several systems in which votres rank several or all of the candidates in the order of their preference, and these rankings are used to determine the outcome. These systems include the Instant Runoff, Restricted Instant Runoff, the Single Transferable Vote, the Borda count, ...


2

In an instant run-off, there are multiple rounds of voting (two, in this case). In the first round, everyone voted for their preferred candidate. In the second round, Jane's voters still vote for Jane, Joe's voters still vote for Joe, and John's voters vote for either Jane or Joe depending on their preferences. So everyone gets a vote in every round. ...


1

Everyone did have one person, one vote. In the first round, everyone was counted on their first choice. In the second round, everyone was counted on either their first or second choice, depending on whether their preferred candidate made the cut. Everyone submitted one ballot. (I'm of course discounting irregularities, which will always show up.) I don'...


1

Under the Due Process clause of the US Constitution, the government may take your property only as authorized by law, and art 11 §5 of the Kansas constitution ("No tax shall be levied except in pursuance of a law, which shall distinctly state the object of the same; to which object only such tax shall be applied"). The difficult part ...


1

My initial thought is that I assume this other school district's schools are actually the closest schools to you and your district has some sort of agreement that children in your area attend that school. The flip side is that you are not actually eligible to vote in that district and are subject to the whims of the voters there. Since you are new to the ...


1

Not sure about California, but here in Colorado, where all voting is by mail, as far as I know there is no problem with having someone fill out your ballot according to your instructions. You still have to sign the ballot before sending it in, to certify that it is filled out according to your wishes. Or if you are unable to sign your name, you can also ...


1

Your scenario is skirting fraud, which is a criminal issue; I'm assuming that was unintentional and that criminal questions were beyond the scope of what you intended. A person could claim standing by demonstrating: They voted successfully, but at a precinct affected where their vote may have been discarded based on the policy in question. They voted ...


1

To vote in a state, you must be a resident of that state. While attending school out of state does not terminate your legal residency in A, establishing residency in B does. If you want to vote in B, become a resident and register in B; if you want to remain a resident of A and vote in A, don't do that. Establishing residency in B generally boils down to ...


1

The state of South Carolina, like all states, has a commission or administrator of elections, which handles voter registration, candidate filings, administers the vote on elections days, interfaces with the public and the press, and sells voter data. This voter data (as pointed out by Dale M) does not include the actual vote cast, but does indicate at very ...


1

According to the act: Upon a finding of a violation of Section 14027 and Section 14028, the court shall implement appropriate remedies, including the imposition of district-based elections, that are tailored to remedy the violation. and The fact that members of a protected class are not geographically compact or concentrated may not preclude a finding ...


1

The current system for electing the president can be changed by the states without a constitutional amendment. The National Popular Vote proposal would ensure that the candidate with the most votes in all 50 states and DC would be elected president. It is a state law, under which states agree that they will assign all of their electors to the candidate who ...


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