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5

It depends in the state. In Florida, the law says: All electors must personally mark or designate their choices on the vote-by-mail ballot, except: (1) Electors who require assistance to vote because of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write, who may have some person of the elector’s choice, other than the elector’s employer, an agent of the ...


3

One legal notion of "abandoned property" pertains to tenants leaving things behind after they leave – clearly not applicable. A second regards e.g. bank accounts that haven't been used for a while, again, clearly not relevant. The law regarding goods dropped in the street, and so on, is here. The law starts by saying Any person who finds a thing ...


11

Since the mod welcomes answers from other jurisdictions a short note on the situation in Germany. In 2017, the head of the federal election commission ("Bundeswahlleiter") filed charges against several persons who took selfies of their mail-in ballots in their homes and published them. He referred to §107c of the penal code that forbids to violate ...


8

In the UK, it's a crime to take any photographs or images inside the polling station. Photographing a ballot paper is a big no-no. Although prosecutions to my knowledge are extremely rare and you would realistically probably just get a telling-off from the police. Unless you did something really egregious like walk around a polling station photographing ...


12

I don't know of any law that prohibits the disclosure of your choices on a ballot. It would certainly be invalidated on First Amendment grounds. There are laws outlawing the disclosure of pictures of your ballot, but there is little remaining debate that these laws violate the First Amendment. New Hampshire's ballot-selfie law was invalidated in 2015, and ...


28

Short answer: It depends on the state and exactly how you do so. Stating how you voted, by itself, is fine; however, taking a photo of your ballot instead of just saying how you voted is illegal in some states, especially if the photo was taken within a polling place. Laws banning these so-called "ballot selfies" may be unconstitutional, and have ...


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