40

I think the officer is probably lying, not just mistaken, but they are not required to always be truthful. In addition to the law against possessing ID with intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any crime, it is also against the law to be knowingly in possession of a stolen credit card, or any other property. An example of a strict-liability possession crime, ...


31

Looking at Washington's Identity Theft statute RCW 9.35.020 No person may knowingly obtain, possess, use, or transfer a means of identification or financial information of another person, living or dead, with the intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any crime. So, just possessing someone else's credit card is not a crime as long as one does not have the ...


5

According to the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries, Under 14 years old In most cases, you need a superior court’s permission for minors under 14 to work. Minors under 14 who are allowed to work must follow the 14-15 year old requirements below. Which may or may not be easy to get. Also: For Employers Employers must complete and sign a ...


5

There are often additional legal measures that the authorities can take to make it more expensive and troublesome for a company that acts in the way described in the question, treating a fine as merely a cost of doing business, or as a "convenience fee". For example, consider the Seattle Building code linked in the question. While section 103.5 ...


5

Yes, but there is a risk If a company persistently violates the law, the regulator can go to court to get an injunction for them and their agents to stop. If they don’t they are now in contempt of court and the fines for that are much steeper. Also, the people in contempt can be jailed until the contempt stops.


4

Fraud may be a crime, or a tort (civil wrong): only criminal fraud can be a "felony". The Washington criminal laws about fraud are here, and they are all fairly specific, such as selling or destroying encumbered property (which is a misdemeanor anyhow), or conducting a mock auction. Most frauds are misdemeanors, though forgeries are in the felony ...


4

In theory its only a crime if you know, or reasonably suspect, that it is stolen. The fact that you have to ask means that you have some level of suspicion, so that's not good to start with. In practice merely being investgated by the police will bring you a world of hurt long before it gets to trial. How much can you afford to spend on legal fees, and will ...


4

This would not be a crime in any US state to the best of my knowledge. In some, but far from all, US states, there is a tort known as "Improper disclosure of private facts". That tort makes it actionable to publish true but embarrassing facts about a person, when they were not public. There are various limits on exactly when such a tort applies, ...


3

You want to construct the building without the necessary entitlements... planning approval, zoning compliance or variance, concessions such as roadbuilding or traffic lights, building plan, work permits etc. You're overlooking some costs there. Right off the bat is the cost of constructing the structure. Mind you, when the dust settles, the municipality will ...


3

You always run some legal risk when you drive. As long as you are insured (you have a card in your hand) and you have permission to drive the car, it does not matter who owns the car. There is a difference between the legal minimum insurance coverage and actually adequate coverage, and since you are not getting separate insurance where control the insurance ...


3

As is often the case with the recording statutes, the meaning of the law is refined by case law. Specifically, the consent requirement holds when the parties have a reasonable expectation of privacy. The statutory language limits the restriction to "private communication": therefore, a person does not gain veto power over a public recording session ...


3

To add to the other answers, ownership or possession of goods obtained by theft is inferior to the ownership of the person from whom goods were stolen, even if the goods were received in good faith without knowledge of the defects. So, the true owners can take goods from you or someone you sold them to, without paying you any compensation, if they were ...


3

No, not for having it/selling it However the police will want to know how you came into possession of the property and may detain you for questioning. You may be asked to provide names, both for who you got it from and who you sold it to. The people you sold it to may sue you and you may not be able to recover that from your friend. If you have any suspicion ...


3

The most you can hope for is that is it very probably legal. Without author's permission, you will have literally violated copyright law. If you are sued, you have a defense available to you, namely "fair use". The problem with fair use is that it's a balancing act, but is it very probable that you would prevail primarily on the grounds that your ...


3

The old terms apply ... ... until the landlord gives notice and ends the lease - then the tenant has to get out. This is not inconsistent with the requirement to “execute all revised rental agreements upon request” - unless and until new terms have been agreed, there are no “revised rental agreements”, once there are, the tenant can be requested to (and must)...


3

renting a single room with three other guys each renting their own rooms means exactly what it says. What you are paying for is that room, plus shared access to the common areas. Without knowing exactly what your lease says, especially with respect to the common areas, it's difficult to give a proper answer. I suspect that the lease for your room says ...


3

Note that it's pretty obviously not illegal to simply possess another person's ID--it's not exactly an unusual situation with couples. I have handed plenty (probably upwards of 100) of government officials my wife's passport, nobody has ever had a problem with that.


3

RCW 9.41.280 prohibits firearms and "dangerous weapons", which does not extend to a tiny knife. Seattle Public Schools does not add anything relevant above state law, nor does Renton, nor Bellevue. Bellevue just says "knives" which is broader than state law, but they refer the question to state law, and such a "knife" would not ...


3

RCW Chapter 26.44 covers abuse of children, and RCW 26.44.030 1(a) states the duty to report: the reporter "has reasonable cause to believe that a child has suffered abuse or neglect" – the law doesn't say "a child is currently suffering abuse", it say "has suffered". But then: subsection (2) says: The reporting requirement of subsection (1) of this ...


3

Can they be charged with anything besides the known $100k penalty for openly deciding to break the law? The answer may depend on US state-specific legislation but In england-and-wales - which is also a Common Law jurisdiction - the demolition of a listed building without proper authorisation is an offence under s.9 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and ...


2

Washington State You are half way there by using a commercial registered office in Washington State, which is common place and meets the primary requirement of providing a physical address at which legal process such as a summons commencing a lawsuit or a legally required notice can be hand delivered. While Washington State does not allow for a mere private ...


1

after the expiration ... Prior to the lease expiring Those are the key words. Once lease has expired the parties are all even. Noone owes anything to anyone (assuming all rent has been paid and there are no claims). Tenant can either sign a new lease on whatever terms can be agreed, or go. The wording "the resident agrees to execute all revised rental ...


1

Probably, but it is hard to be sure. It depends on the contract and what warranties are made. Hypothetically speaking, you might ask a tile contractor to install a Kerdi liner and tile over it, but that system may be out of his experience zone. If the contract specifies how the liner is to be installed (perhaps simply via reference to the technical standard),...


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