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42

In Germany, nuclear weapons are considered weapons of war, which are heavily regulated. In particular, under § 17 KrWaffKontrG, it is prohibited to develop or produce nuclear weapons or trade in them or acquire them from or leave them to another person or import or export them or transport them through the territory of the Federal Republic or in any other ...


39

In the US there are a couple of laws preventing a private citizen from owning a nuclear weapon: Possession of any radiological weapon is prohibited by 18 U.S. Code § 832 - Participation in nuclear and weapons of mass destruction threats to the United States (specifically paragraph (c)) (c) Whoever without lawful authority develops, possesses, or attempts ...


14

In the UK this would be covered by both the generic Offensive Weapons Act and more specific prohibitions on explosives, but I'd like to point out that there is a specific ban on using them: Any person who knowingly causes a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction on indictment to ...


11

Almost certainly, there is no such right. It's illegal under 18 USC 831 to possess "nuclear material" without specific authorization. 18 USC 832 forbids the possession of a "radiological weapon". If there is intent to use the device to cause death, serious bodily injury, or damage to property or the environment, that's also a violation of 18 USC 2332i. ...


10

42 U.S. Code § 2122(a): It shall be unlawful, except as provided in section 2121 of this title, for any person, inside or outside of the United States, to knowingly participate in the development of, manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, receive, possess, import, export, or use, or possess and threaten to use, any atomic weapon. Following the ...


8

Sure: No Constitutional rights are totally unencumbered. Even natural rights like the "right to life" are legally "infringed" through various theories (e.g., self-defense, capital punishment, warfare). The Second Amendment has been interpreted as a right to keep and bear weapons that would reasonably be used in self-defense or in military service. You don'...


8

New Zealand specifically has the "New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act 1987", which states in section 5: No person, who is a New Zealand citizen or a person ordinarily resident in New Zealand, shall, within the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone,— manufacture, acquire, or possess, or have control over, any nuclear ...


7

In the US, it is illegal to sell screwdrivers to Gaza without a license, see 31 CFR 595.409. There are numerous rules pertaining to the Palestinian Authority staring here. Dept. of State has a partial list of countries and their associated restrictions, if you want "like Gaza", and note that they warn you that this is not a complete list. If you are ...


6

In the US, it depends on the jurisdiction because each state has its own homicide statutes: but, the defining elements don't differ a lot. Drawing on Washington state law, the first question is whether you intended to kill a person (it doesn't have to be a specific person). If you did, you have committed first-degree murder. It is first-degree murder, ...


6

Depending on the state, menacing may be a separate offense from assault. For example, here is New York State's law on menacing (New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN §120.13–16): §120.13: A person is guilty of menacing in the first degree when he or she commits the crime of menacing in the second degree and has been previously convicted of the crime ...


6

In France, the control of nuclear materials and facilities is governed by the part I, book III, title III, chapter III of the Defence Code. The article L1333-13-4 in particular deals with nuclear weapons (translation and emphasised text is mine): II.-The offenses defined in sections I.1 and I.2 of the article L. 1333-9 (undue appropriation of nuclear ...


6

It ultimately depends on the situation, but here's a general breakdown: Many states in the United States have anti-trespassing laws that allow citizens to use deadly force in response to threat of bodily harm. These laws and statutes intersect to provide more protections for gun owners encountering trespassers, burglars, or thieves in their home. However, ...


5

UK answer: Murder requires 2 things, intention to commit murder, and the causing of someone's death. It's easy enough to prove that you physically caused the death of anyone that your autonomous drone kills, since if you didn't activate/program/launch the drone in the first place, these people would still be alive. Regarding the intention to commit murder,...


5

18 USC 922(g) says that it is illegal for various persons to ship or transport in interstate or foreign commerce, or possess in or affecting commerce, any firearm or ammunition; or to receive any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce. (5) refers to "being an alien", specifically one who ...


5

If a reasonable person would fear bodily harm as a result (and they would) then this is assault.


5

CO Rev Stat § 18-12-105.5(1) says that A person commits a class 6 felony if such person knowingly and unlawfully and without legal authority carries, brings, or has in such person's possession a deadly weapon as defined in section 18-1-901 (3) (e) in or on the real estate and all improvements erected thereon of any public or private elementary, ...


4

In the U.S., there is no personal identification document. That's not really true. There is no standard personal identification document issued by the national government (if you don't count passports), but state governments do issue such documents. The most common is a state-issued driver license, and people who do not drive can be issued a "non-driver ...


4

You could almost define a country as, "an entity that can defend itself against invasions." Non-sovereign entities are indeed generally prohibited from deploying lethal autonomous defense systems like booby-traps. But governments and state-like actors, as a matter of practice, choose their own rules. laws-of-war and international-law are not like "regular"...


4

Illegal weapons Weapons are defined and are made illegal by statute. In many states, it is illegal to possess brass knuckles. For example, California penal code 12020(a)(1) makes it illegal to possess "any metal knuckles", "writing pen knife", "any leaded cane", among other things. I don't know of any state where it is illegal to pick up a stick, or keys, ...


4

You face two legal perils when you use a firearm against a wild animal: Most wild animals are protected or regulated as game by state and/or federal law. Unnecessarily discharging a firearm is forbidden in many jurisdictions. With respect to both charges, self defense is almost always a justification (assuming the possession of the weapon used was lawful). ...


4

In addition to the answer by @Nij, this would be like people taking potentially offensive weapons to and from martial arts events. I was taught that any offensive weapons should be carried in a bag, at the bottom of a separate bag. This was to make it hard (and shown to be hard) to access. I would do a similar thing with your arrows. From my limited ...


4

If the train operator allows it, yes, you would be permitted to do so. There are no laws specifically against the carrying of bows and/or arrows, nor is a licence required for their purchase. Bows can be carried openly with less issue, but arrows (because of their ease of use as a weapon) should be stored securely and safely, because this protects you and ...


4

New Hampshire is a "constitutional carry" state. The term "constitutional carry" is not a legal term but, rather, a catchphrase used to describe states that have adopted, either by statute or state constitution, that no permit is required to carry a gun either openly displayed or concealed. The phrase comes from a belief among many that the constitution is a ...


3

The felon-possession law is Utah Code Ann. §76-10-503, which distinguishes Category I restricted person and Category II restricted person, a complex definitions that distinguish felons in general and violent felons, as defined at Utah Code Ann. § 76-3-203.5. In the case stricter case, the law says: (2) A Category I restricted person who intentionally or ...


3

The authority you are looking for is District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008). In this judgement, SCOTUS explained limitations of the second amendment. There is extensive historical analysis, but for your purpose, this is the important clause: [T]he right to keep arms involves, necessarily, the right to use such arms for all the ordinary ...


3

Indiana has no state law against carrying an expandable baton, a.k.a. asp. (Hard to prove a negative, but here's one reference in support.) NB: Batons are considered deadly weapons. NBB: Laws on these weapons vary tremendously by state, and sometimes even by city, so this answer should not be construed to apply to any jurisdiction outside of Indiana!


3

First of all, the wording in your question hints at the UK deliberately launching a missile (even if it is a test one) towards the USA. Nothing in the news piece you link to support that supposition, the general idea is a missile that was launched towards the Atlantic Ocean that steered off route. From your link: The treaty recognizes five states as ...


3

Technically, no, you must have have reasonable excuse or lawful or authority to carry a weapon in public and 'Self Defense' is not normally a reasonable excuse. However if you mean 'Can I do it without fear of prosecution' then the answer is 'Yes' as long as you can provide a reasonable excuse when asked why you are carrying the weapon. It's a very ...


3

JeffUK has quoted the relevant law. However the question then becomes "what is an 'offensive weapon'", and "what is a lawful excuse?". Almost anything can be classified as an offensive weapon if you can use it as a weapon. See https://www.askthe.police.uk/content/Q338.htm A lawful excuse is something like "I am going to play baseball, which is why I have ...


3

Assuming these are common law crimes (Kenya is a common law country - sort of) or statutory crimes that have codified common law crimes without substantially changing them. It is not attempted murder - this requires an intent to kill. Pulling the trigger would have that intent, pointing it doesn't. It is assault if it puts the victim in fear of immediate ...


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