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This is a common issue when a contractor is hired to write a technical document. Under united-states law, at least, the answer is clear. The contractor owns the copyright unless there is a written agreement transferring the copyright. This may or may not be a work-for-hire agreement, and there are some significant differences in the effects if it is, but an ...


20

For cases where this occurred within the United States, with works created on or after January 1, 1978: (the OP has since clarified that their scenario occurred elsewhere) By default, the author (the actual creator) of a work is the owner of the copyright. However, this is not the case if the work is a "work made for hire" for an employer. In ...


7

Is there a reason why you want to include real examples in the book? There is no implication that an example is real unless you make that claim. I think you should consider how much effort it will take to rewrite existing resumes enough to avoid all of the issues already mentioned (and others) vs. writing new resumes about fake people specifically for the ...


5

In general, "a signed piece of paper" is not "a contract". It may be a record of a contract, but the contract itself is the meeting of minds where an agreement is reached and doesn't depend on the existence of the piece of paper. (Depending on the jurisdiction, some sorts of contract are required to be in writing, but this doesn't usually apply to ...


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This varies with jurisdiction. (Since OP appears not to be in the US this is important) In the US the company would retain copyright IF you were an employee or if there was a written agreement stating they own the copyright. However in NZ if a company paid you for the work then they own the copyright. In AU, who retains copyright depends on the medium (i.e., ...


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According to the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries, Under 14 years old In most cases, you need a superior court’s permission for minors under 14 to work. Minors under 14 who are allowed to work must follow the 14-15 year old requirements below. Which may or may not be easy to get. Also: For Employers Employers must complete and sign a ...


4

Liable, yes. How much liable, depends. There would be copyright infringement, and with copyright infringement the exact facts count. Like did you commit copyright infringement to make money, were you aware that you committed copyright infringement etc. With your contract, it seems clear you didn't set out to commit copyright infringement to make money (...


3

Ask As an employee, anything you create in the course of your employment belongs to your employer. Now, writing textbooks is probably not in the course of a schoolteacher's employment. Note that I said "probably" - it's possible that if you publish and it becomes wildly successful your employer might just want to go to court to check how "...


3

As @Martin Bonner has already answered, a "signed piece of paper" would merely be an evidentiary record of any contract into which you have already entered. Should you ever need to prove the terms that have been agreed, such a document would be useful—but is not strictly necessary. Whether clear enough terms (for a contract to exist) have actually been ...


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It's not just copyright. My resume contains my private information. If you publish my resume, that's a violation of my privacy. If I find out, I'll come after you for that. And it will kill your business, because nobody will want you to write their resume and then see it published in a book. As far as copyright is concerned: First, you created a derivative ...


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Yes Your employee is your agent, everything they do in the course of their employment is legally done by you.


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You have misunderstood, or the person from Adobe has misinformed you. Under united-states law work done by a fereelancer is initially under copyright by the freelancer, unless there is a valid contract making it a work-made-for-hire (WFH). But even if such a work is not a WFH the copyright may be transferred to the client if a contract provides for such a ...


2

If you are an employee, yes provided that you are paid at least the minimum wage for the hours worked. A contract for Y% commission but not less that $X per hour (where $X is the minimum hourly rate) would be fine. If you are an independent contractor, yes. However, ... You are not an independent contractor just because you say you are!!!!! If the nature of ...


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The best thing to do is ask the attorney for your school district and your union representative or attorney that you are writing a textbook for your subject in your spare time; they will give you a definitive answer on what is "work for hire", what is in your contract and what you can do outside of work and how copyright will apply. The school ...


2

There was a contract between you and the company, it just wasn’t written down. If the company sued you for copyright infringement - which the can do whether they own the copyright or not - the judge would decide based on the actual facts what kind of contract there actually was. And that would decide who is the copyright owner and what rights you and the ...


1

In the US, under 17 USC sec. 101 (definitions) A “work made for hire” is— (1) a work prepared by an employee within the scope of his or her employment; or (2) a work specially ordered or commissioned for use as a contribution to a collective work, as a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, as a translation, as a supplementary work, as a ...


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The buyer owns the copyright by default ("unless clearly stated otherwise"), but only because the Fiverr Terms of Service say so (except for work created through their Logo Maker, which has different rules) I thought it would be seen like regular paid work, as in everything you create at work is property of the company employing you to work there. ...


1

I am inferring your level of legal experience from the way you wrote this. (which is to say, quite little). And as you say in comments, you are in Colombia. Nope, cannot do it. It is a complete lose to even try, because of the hoops and hurdles in your way, many of which are dead-ends. When an employee creates "work product" as part of their ...


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I am probably the least knowledgeable person in this site when it comes to law, but I do write software for a living. I believe IP laws and jurisprudence might see code in a way that is similar to other forms of IP. So I will use an example from music. Last year a federal judge in the US ruled that Katy Perry's song Dark Horse infringed on the copyrights of ...


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Is Medium at risk of legal action? They are, in as much as anyone or any company is due to the nature of civil law, i.e. just about anyone can take anyone else to civil court. That is where "legal conflicts of interest" are worked out. But I'd assume that Medium's lawyers have covered the bases in terms of adhering to state and federal laws that govern ...


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If the derivative work is made without the permission of the copyright holder or not under fair use/dealing (i.e. it is an infringing work) then the original owner is legally the owner of the derivative work. If the derivative work is made with the permission of the copyright holder (including the terms of any licence) or under fair use/dealing (i.e. it is ...


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As an employee you are performing "work for hire". All IP produced by work for hire belongs to the hirer i.e. your employer owns it, you don't. Some jurisdictions recognise moral copyright which generally grants the individual creator rights to attribution and for their work to not be used in a way which could damage their reputation or the artistic merit ...


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