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7

Under the DMCA(United States Federal Law: Digital Millennium Copyright Act) and its Safe Harbor provisions, yes, Youtube is protected from copyright claims, provided they comply when they receive a notice. But....the DMCA that gives Youtube (and its parent company Google/Alphabet) this shield is US law, but Youtube does large amounts of business in other ...


7

Should I ask for a contract, when asking for the money? The proper time to define or formalize a contract is not when asking for the money, but when agreeing what tasks are expected from you and how much you will charge therefor. That way both parties will be clear on what is expected from each other. And if a dispute is brought to court, the fact-finder ...


5

Unfortunately, the "but everyone does that" (BEDT) argument doesn't hold water as evidenced by prosecutions of looters. Would uploading this video be a copyright infringement? It would be hard to answer this part of the question without knowing where and from whom the clips had come from. If the clips came from a company like ESPN or a YouTuber that ...


5

No, a company cannot suspend your GDPR rights – contracts can't override the law. Your rights as a data subject apply as long as your personal data is being processed. However, there is no requirement in the GDPR that they fulfill your data subject rights through a self-service mechanism like a “download my data” button. They can require you to use another ...


5

It's illegal if the intent is to deceive. Under S50(1) of the Police Act 1996: Any person who with intent to deceive impersonates a member of a police force or special constable, or makes any statement or does any act calculated falsely to suggest that he is such a member or constable, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to ...


4

This has some basis in law. You need permission from a person to commercially exploit their likeness especially in California, and a waiver is a way of staving off future lawsuit over right of publicity. YT has a privacy policy whereby a person who have been filmed can request removal of the video (see also this, because they don't explain the policy in a ...


4

Yes, as long as they give you credit, the Creative Commons - Attribution License (CC-BY) allows a person to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially


4

The "Standard Youtube License" or TOS reads You shall not copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, display, sell, license, or otherwise exploit any Content for any other purposes without the prior written consent of YouTube or the respective licensors of the Content. That stipulates no "free usage" and as such, you cannot use a screenshot (...


4

In general, a gameplay video would be either a partial copy or a derivative work, and in either case an infringement if created without permission. Such a video might be covered under fair use in US copyright law, particularly if made for the purpose of commentary on a game or instruction in how to play or design a game. In general, a fair use defense is ...


4

With respect to the Table of Contents - in the US: https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf What Is Not Protected by Copyright? Copyright does not protect • Ideas, procedures, methods, systems, processes, concepts, principles, or discoveries • Works that are not fixed in a tangible form (such as a choreographic work that has not been notated or recorded ...


3

Evaluating a potential copyright violation is very fact-intensive, so we don't have enough information to answer the question. Making a copy is generally going to be a copyright violation, but there's still going to be a lot of breathing room under the fair use doctrine. Again, we'd need more details to provide a useful answer, but you may be able to ...


3

Everything you need to know about uploading to YouTube and copyright law is in their Terms of Service, particularly the section of Copyright: Copyright and rights management - YouTube Help and in the Frequently asked copyright questions - YouTube Help. It is simply illegal to upload movies for which you don't have copyright or a license to distribute. ...


3

If Mayo's content was against YouTube's Terms of Service, due to copyright, illegal activity or lack of model releases for the people filmed, I think by now Google would have taken his channel down due to complaints and Google's own housekeeping. To me this seems like he directly profits off of destroying these people's reputations... What is happening ...


3

Recipes themselves are not protectable as intellectual property and a meal made with a recipe is, therefore, not a derivative work (because the meal is not derivative of the particular expression of the recipe which is entitled to protection). The precise expression of a recipe on a printed page is protectable, but that is all. Ideally, you wouldn't read or ...


3

You may have issues if you take their content wholesale. Even if they freely distribute them, they still retain copyright. As such, they absolutely can claim copyright. Whether they will or not is another question. Your best bet around this is Fair Use doctrine. You can take a part of their work (e.g: a single question) and do your video based on how you ...


2

Youtube is very clear on their usage policy; Music from this library is intended solely for use by you in videos and other content that you create. Futhermore, when you download the music from their library. You agree that you will not make it available in any form or anything other than your own creations. Here is the exact text they use regarding ...


2

The information contained in the end credits probably isn't protected by copyright (which protects expressions of ideas, not ideas and facts themselves), instead it protects the particular way that those end credits are expressed. Hence, the background music and the font of the text and any other fideldy bits that go in there to interest the audience are ...


2

Another issue not discussed is that he is technically making a "Citizens' Arrest" which is a lawful arrest by a non-deputized citizen of a person who is breaking the law. In Common Law districts such as the United States, Citizens' Arrests are legal provided that the person who is subject to the arrest is treated in a legal fashion by the person arresting ...


2

Yes it's illegal. Just like singing/whistling happy birthday in public (used to be) illegal. You could be sued for untold amount of damages that could ruin your life forever (in theory). If you whistle a mashup remix then it's legal as long as it's different enough from the original that you can't tell that they are the same song anymore. Yes anyone can ...


2

You would have created a "derivative work" (PDF link) of the original. If you did so without permission then you will have violated the copyright of the creator. The link above is for the US, but most jurisdictions are substantially similar.


2

No matter who uploads video content to YouTube - be it an individual, another site or a third-party app - the uploader is still bound by YouTube's Terms of Service and copyright stipulations: You further agree that Content you submit to the Service will not contain third party copyrighted material, or material that is subject to other third party ...


2

The FTC has not been explicit about how their threat works, but it probably involves holding Youtube and channel-owners jointly liable. Already, Youtube has been held massively liable for child-directed content that they didn't create. Under COPPA regulations, a Web site or online service directed to children means a commercial Web site or online ...


2

If the book you read is in the public domain* you should be fine. Otherwise what you are doing is copyright infringement and probably not protected by fair use**. One of the rights granted to copyright holders is to control derivative works, and transference to different mediums, which is what your recordings would be. Under US law, whether an instance of ...


2

The question doesn't say what the source of the original image of the tattooed person is. That image will be protected by copyright, unless it has been released under a permissive license, or is old enough that copyright has expired (unlikely), or has lost or never had copyright protection for some other reason (possible but also unlikely). In the absence ...


2

Indiviual words and short phrases such as titles cannot be protected by copyright. However, they can be protected by trademark law. "Android" is a trademark in the US, in the EU, and I am pretty sure in most if not all other countries. Trademark protection is specific to a purpose or area. If you are writing an SF novel which contains an artificial being, ...


2

The question that you need to answer is whether, when you embed, you "copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, display, sell, license, or otherwise exploit any Content". It seems that you have done that, i.e. you didn't just "watch". The next question is whether you have "prior written consent of YouTube". Youtube requires a license from ...


2

"But he doesn't even sing!" If music only consisted of lyrics, you'd have a point. But you already said exactly how the infringement happened: playing the guitar. The content usage is clear: the video uses the song's melody, and therefore is infringing on copyright. It doesn't matter how long or little is played. Copyright infringement suits have been ...


2

When you produce a creative work and fix it in a tangible medium, which you do if you make a video and post it to YouTube, it is automatically protected by copyright. There is nothing special you need to do to copyright it. Note that by posting it to YouTube, you are granting YouTube a very broad license to copy and distribute the video.


2

Depending on where you and they are in the world, it appears highly unprofessional for them to start things without a contract. They presumably own a piece of content, you work on it, surely they still want to hold all rights afterwards. If they don't insist on a written contract that should be a very bad sign.


2

An "idea" is not copyrightable, though the video itself is. There's nothing legally stopping you seeing a video about a villager apartment, for example, and making your own "How to make a villager apartment block" video. That said, some people will consider it unethical- provoke Youtube drama at your own risk. However, there are some ...


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