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13

Does this mean all countries law applies to it? Basically yes. If the videos are in english and are about science in general does this mean if some country some day bans ( imprisonment ) science videos or use of a specific colour in videos can they extraterritorialy enforce this imprisonment if they are in some other country like USA or India? With ...


7

Under the DMCA(United States Federal Law: Digital Millennium Copyright Act) and its Safe Harbor provisions, yes, Youtube is protected from copyright claims, provided they comply when they receive a notice. But....the DMCA that gives Youtube (and its parent company Google/Alphabet) this shield is US law, but Youtube does large amounts of business in other ...


7

Should I ask for a contract, when asking for the money? The proper time to define or formalize a contract is not when asking for the money, but when agreeing what tasks are expected from you and how much you will charge therefor. That way both parties will be clear on what is expected from each other. And if a dispute is brought to court, the fact-finder ...


5

Under U.S. law, Section 230 (47 U.S.C. § 230) limits liability for comments solely to the comment maker and not to the video uploader or YouTube. It basically says that there is no duty to moderate except for copyright upon a takedown notice. Normally takedown notices would be directed to YouTube which has a process that handles that, and not to the uploader,...


5

It's illegal if the intent is to deceive. Under S50(1) of the Police Act 1996: Any person who with intent to deceive impersonates a member of a police force or special constable, or makes any statement or does any act calculated falsely to suggest that he is such a member or constable, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to ...


5

No, a company cannot suspend your GDPR rights – contracts can't override the law. Your rights as a data subject apply as long as your personal data is being processed. However, there is no requirement in the GDPR that they fulfill your data subject rights through a self-service mechanism like a “download my data” button. They can require you to use another ...


4

With respect to the Table of Contents - in the US: https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf What Is Not Protected by Copyright? Copyright does not protect • Ideas, procedures, methods, systems, processes, concepts, principles, or discoveries • Works that are not fixed in a tangible form (such as a choreographic work that has not been notated or recorded ...


4

Many We know, that YouTubers can sue each other using the US Court system since the "Akila Obviously v Sargon of Akkad" - Akilah Saidah Kamaria Hughes is a New Yorker, Carl Benjamin is a British citizen. Their Lawsuit ended in a US court, and Mr. Benjamin won under Fair Use. We also know that Youtube offers the ability to flag videos as violating ...


3

This is the earliest dispute resolution clause I can find for Patreon. Some points to note: It calls up (as do all subsequent revisions) JAMS Streamlined Arbitration Rules & Procedures, These allow the consolidation of arbitration’s between different parties over the same issue, Patreon’s liability is limited to the amount collected from the particular ...


3

Recipes themselves are not protectable as intellectual property and a meal made with a recipe is, therefore, not a derivative work (because the meal is not derivative of the particular expression of the recipe which is entitled to protection). The precise expression of a recipe on a printed page is protectable, but that is all. Ideally, you wouldn't read or ...


3

You may have issues if you take their content wholesale. Even if they freely distribute them, they still retain copyright. As such, they absolutely can claim copyright. Whether they will or not is another question. Your best bet around this is Fair Use doctrine. You can take a part of their work (e.g: a single question) and do your video based on how you ...


2

An "idea" is not copyrightable, though the video itself is. There's nothing legally stopping you seeing a video about a villager apartment, for example, and making your own "How to make a villager apartment block" video. That said, some people will consider it unethical- provoke Youtube drama at your own risk. However, there are some ...


2

Depending on where you and they are in the world, it appears highly unprofessional for them to start things without a contract. They presumably own a piece of content, you work on it, surely they still want to hold all rights afterwards. If they don't insist on a written contract that should be a very bad sign.


2

Potentially. You didn't list a location so I'll go with a generic US/UK/similar answer here. Two things would be necessary here- damages and fault. Damages in this case could be physical (loss of hearing), financial (replacing the headphones) or emotional (gaining a fear of ASMR- this one's the hardest to prove). Fault in this case would be negligence rather ...


2

No, Youtube does not gain copyright for several reasons: Youtube creates a derivate that is virtually the same as the original safe for the encoding. This means there is no transformation done, precluding fair use, and demanding a license, which you grant them in the ToS. Youtube does create the work according to a contract with the uploader, where YT gets ...


2

When you produce a creative work and fix it in a tangible medium, which you do if you make a video and post it to YouTube, it is automatically protected by copyright. There is nothing special you need to do to copyright it. Note that by posting it to YouTube, you are granting YouTube a very broad license to copy and distribute the video.


2

This would be considered a derivative work and therefore require permission from the copyright holder. In many cases, fanart such as the 3d rendering in your example is ignored because it the publicity is beneficial to the creator. This is entirely the copyright holder's perogative however.


1

Generally, a multinational company is subject to the laws and regulations of the country where they do buisness, so it will depend on the nature of the country. In Youtube's case, some videos may not be available in countries where it cannot for a host of reasons show the video. This is why so many big Youtubers actually work do adverts for VPNs, which, ...


1

A request to arbitrate can be challenged in court on a number of grounds. In this case, there is a legitimate argument, apparently raised in a court, that fans are not entitled to invoke an arbitration clause to compel arbitration related to a dispute between Patreon and a third-party. The existence of an arbitration agreement that is applicable to the ...


1

If your work is advertising your filter, and if the use of the names or logos might reasonably cause potential consumers to think your product was authorized or endorsed by the makers of any of those other products, thus would clearly constitute trademark infringement under US law. Even if there is no suggestion of endorsement, if the video is advertising ...


1

YouTube offers posters a choice of 2 licences Standard YouTube Licence This allows YouTube to broadcast and others to link to that broadcast. You can’t make derivative works which is what your translation app does. Creative Commons Licence Users who choose this option allow deriving works if you comply with the licence.


1

I’m a bit confused here. Usually watermarks are used to reduce the commercial value of an image or video. It doesn’t affect copyright. It is unlikely that someone can claim adding a “do not copy” watermark to an image creates a derived work. And a “do not copy” watermark is likely not creative enough to have its own copyright. You may have permission to ...


1

The short answer is, it's complicated. Now for the long answer: In principle, if portions of the software are being directly included in the video (e.g. the art assets of a video game), then this can give rise to liability as a derivative work. This is true regardless of the license, unless the software is in the public domain. In practice, allowing fans ...


1

I know this is the law stack, but to backfill OP's understanding of the issue at large: Youtube also has business reasons. Having worked in content management in a very similar web platform, I can tell you two of them right off the bat. They don't want their platform flooded with crud. They want Youtube to be about original content like Blancolirio or ...


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