2018
May
11
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
16
awarded  Autobiographer
2017
Jul
9
accepted Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
Jul
6
comment Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
Can a local or state police officer enforce a federal law if they'd like?
Jul
6
comment Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
If the judicial branch is involved with state law creation, how is it that they allow states to make laws that contradict the federal laws? Do they explicitly decide to do this?
Jul
6
comment Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
Also, to be clear, the judicial branch doesn't "filter out" state law proposals that contradict federal laws before they become accepted as state laws? If not, why not? Because they see value in telling citizens "us [state] doesn't care if you do this and won't prosecute you, but you still can't safely do it because the Feds disagree with us"?
Jul
6
comment Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
I suppose this is a separate question, but what happens if something is illegal by the state, but legal federally. I assume that the state wouldn't actually be able to punish you, because you said that federal always supersedes state, but I'm not sure if my interpretation is correct.
Jul
6
revised Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
added 253 characters in body
Jul
6
comment Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
Is it a gray area in the sense that state law supersedes federal law at times? Or in the sense that sometimes states are allowed to make laws that contradict federal law, and sometimes they're not?
Jul
6
asked Is recreational marijuana actually legal in states that voted it to be legal?
Jun
3
revised Can an apartment release my package without approval, warning, or notification?
added 5 characters in body
Jun
3
asked Can an apartment release my package without approval, warning, or notification?
Apr
29
comment Is it illegal in any way to solicit reviews?
Seems related, and potentially the same answers, but ultimately, the question is a different one.
Apr
27
asked Is it illegal in any way to solicit reviews?
Jan
26
comment How can people confess to their drug use in a book without any legal consequences?
@TimLymington no need, I understand now. I didn't realize that it extended to testimony. Thanks!
Jan
25
comment How can people confess to their drug use in a book without any legal consequences?
@TimLymington I was assuming that they were asked to testify, and that while testifying, you're not protected by that. Were either of those assumptions wrong?
Jan
19
comment Can “Dumb Starbucks” be legally considered Fair Use as satire or parody?
Would you mind elaborating on what you mean by "transformative"? I don't quite understand.
Jan
19
comment Why are lawyers typically excluded from juries?
What about the possibility where both sides genuinely believe that the law is in their favor? If that were the case, and if the premises in this answer are true, then I'd think both sides would reason, "Sure, put a lawyer in the jury. The law is on our side, so it'll be good for us." The fact that this doesn't happen seems to imply that in court cases, it's actually pretty clear who should win, which is scary. With that said, it'd be interesting to see data on how frequently the side who used a preemptory strike on a lawyer ended up winning the case.
Jan
18
comment How can people confess to their drug use in a book without any legal consequences?
I see. But I'd think they'd have some specific memory of using it. Ie. "On New Years at home with my girlfriend." However, that seems hard enough to prove such that they might be willing to risk lying under oath for. Out of curiosity, how much detail do they really need to prosecute? Date + time + location are all necessary?
Jan
18
comment How can people confess to their drug use in a book without any legal consequences?
(cont.) Wouldn't the public admission be enough for a court to order the offender to testify? That would provide evidence and detail. From there, wouldn't it be a bit of a crazy move on the offenders part to lie under oath? If it is indeed a "crazy" move to lie under oath, then an order to testify means they'll have to admit their crime, plead guilty, and be convicted. Am I wrong about any of this?