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I have found it is usually the landlord who is responsible for most repairs and this is specified in the lease (barring tenant negligence or other stated reasons why a tenant would be responsible). However, in the case of a tenant being responsible for repairs and maintenance, does the tenant own the parts they used to repair an appliance or air conditioner or any other item that was attached to / included with the home? If they do, can they take those parts with them if the lease ends?

(Assume there is no clause in the lease that defines any item's expected condition before or after the lease term.)

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    If you take the parts, the appliance will be in unrepaired state, right? Thus your responsibility for repairs won't be fulfilled. Therefore, the parts remain the property of the landlord. – Greendrake Sep 24 '18 at 22:44
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For rentals, lacking any language in the rental agreement, the general rule is any modifications (repairs or upgrades) or installations of permanent fixtures become part of the house and are no longer the property of the tenant. Any of those repairs belong to the house that your landlord owns and as a result belong to your landlord. Further if you go out and buy a wonderful $2,000 glass chandler and hardwood floors for the entrance hall, you cannot take those with you when you leave, unless you have an arrangement with the landlord. A TV wall mount probably wouldn't count though since it is not truly permanent.

In any case, Its always best to decide terms in the agreement up front than to make a judge decide it latter.

Besides, for your obligation to perform repairs, you probably (/should) get a discount in your rent compared to the counterfactual of the landlord performing repairs.

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    Actually, light fixtures are not fixtures so you can take the chandelier – Dale M Oct 17 '18 at 11:07
  • @DaleM I was told otherwise. Maybe it varies by jurisdiction? – D M Oct 27 '18 at 16:50

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