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Are the fonts that come with Ubuntu free for personal and commercial use? I tried Googling it but nothing came up.

  • On the face of it, it's not even legal to download it, which I know is not the case. They aren't cooperative in terms of where they put their license, and without that, there's no way to answer the question. – user6726 Jun 30 '17 at 16:12
  • @user6726: What do you mean by "They aren't cooperative in terms of where they put their license"? The licence is in a file copyright for every package. – sleske Jul 3 '17 at 8:10
  • Point me to the license online. I'm not gonna download and install just to read it. They don't even give you visible permission to download. – user6726 Jul 3 '17 at 14:27
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Are the fonts that come with Ubuntu free for personal and commercial use?

In general: Yes. Everything included in the main Ubuntu distribution (the programs, the data, and also the fonts) may be freely used and modified. The details are explained on the Ubuntu Licencing page:

All application software in both 'main' and 'restricted' must meet the following requirements:

  • Must allow redistribution.

[..]

  • Must not require royalty payments or any other fee for redistribution or modification.

[..]

  • Must not discriminate against persons, groups or against fields of endeavour. The licence of software included in Ubuntu can not discriminate against anyone or any group of users and cannot restrict users from using the software for a particular field of endeavour - a business for example. So we will not distribute software that is licensed "freely for non-commercial use".

Note one restriction, however: This only applies to the repositories ''main'' and ''restricted''. Ubuntu repositories are stores of software packages provided by Ubuntu, or by third parties. If you use other repositories than ''main'' and ''restricted'', you will have to check the licensing for yourself.

Finally, if you are unsure about a specific program of font, check the license. For each software package installed, there will be a file /usr/share/doc/<package name>/copyright, which contains the copyright notice and the licence the software is distributed under. Check that to be sure.

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