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In a work contract there is the following term

Duty to Devote Full Time

The Employee agrees to devote full-time efforts, as an employee of the Employer, to the employment duties and obligations as described in this Agreement.

Does this mean the person would not be able to have any job at all outside of the scope of this one? Or just jobs that may interfere with the performance of this one? For example of this job takes place Monday to Friday and is for an accounting firm, would it be ok to have a paid job dressing up as a mascot for a sports team over the weekend?

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Does this mean the person would not be able to have any job at all outside of the scope of this one? Or just jobs that may interfere with the performance of this one?

Just the jobs that may interfere with the performance of this one, unless "the employment duties and obligations as described in this Agreement" explicitly prohibit the employee to work elsewhere while retaining employment with this employer.

Without knowing about Canada law, I doubt that full-time is statutorily defined to encompass employee's time outside his normal work hours.

The contract clause is redundant because it merely formulates one trivial expectation about almost every job position.

  • This appears to set out what you think should be the position, rather than what contract law provides. – Tim Lymington supports Monica Nov 22 '18 at 20:43
  • @TimLymington This type of prejudicial and very unspecific criticism is useless to the OP, and it really does not identify where your apparent confusion lies. Contract law nowhere defines "full-time job", let alone to encompass a person's time outside that job or schedule. Given the information as stated by the OP, taking a 2nd job on weekends is not very likely to hinder the efforts a person devotes to the full-time job that is the subject matter of the contract. – Iñaki Viggers Nov 22 '18 at 22:41

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