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6

Yes. This is clearly kidnapping. It is probably not a terribly aggravated sub-type of kidnapping, but it is kidnapping nonetheless. It is probably a felony. The fact that the victim does not press charges, or ratifies the conduct after the fact, does not change the fact that a crime was committed. The police decision to arrest the ex-boyfriend was ...


5

First degree kidnapping is abducting with various exploitative intents such as ransom, using as human shield, or messing with government function. Second degree kidnapping is any abduction, with an exception if (1) The abduction is not coupled with intent to use or to threaten to use deadly force, (2) The actor is a relative of the person abducted, ...


4

What you are charged with - murder and the appropriate degree, manslaughter, felony assault or other crime - depends on the local or federal prosecutor (and possibly a grand jury), the jurisdiction and how the prosecutor views the evidence; and if the prosecutor feels they can win a conviction against you in front of a jury for the charges. The prosecutor ...


3

In the UK, broadly speaking it is not illegal to pay a ransom. However, there may be circumstances such that arranging or paying a ransom constitutes a terrorist financing offence - although a prosecution might be deemed against the public interest. I'm not aware of any such prosecutions. Section 15 (3) of the Terrorism Act 2000 makes it an offence for a ...


2

The NSW Crimes Act 1900 s86 deals with kidnapping. 86 Kidnapping (1) Basic offence A person who takes or detains a person, without the person's consent: (a) with the intention of holding the person to ransom, or (a1) with the intention of committing a serious indictable offence, or (b) with the intention of obtaining any other ...


2

Assuming the United States, the general rule is that Self-Defense extends to defense of others in similar situations and your immediate care. As your baby is your responsibility, you may protect the child in the same manner as any propety you may protect. There may be some issues with states that have duty to flee (which is to say, you do not have the ...


1

Child Abduction new-south-wales Crimes Act 1900 s87 87 CHILD ABDUCTION (1) A person who takes or detains a child with the intention of removing or keeping the child from the lawful control of any person having parental responsibility for the child, without the consent of that person, is liable to imprisonment for 10 years.


1

The recording-people-dilemma (in the US) Your app is, in its core functionality, very much the same as a dictaphone or wiretap: it records people in its surroundings. Now, when is recording a person legal? That depends on where the person using the app is, and what law applies there. Let me grab two examples, one NewYork (I learned about its law from the ...


1

It would depend very, very highly on the facts and circumstances. For a real brain-bender on that one, watch a movie called "10 Cloverfield Lane". (it's not what it first appears to be). However you must balance that "kidnapping" charge against a duty of care which compel some people to help you, and the good Samaritan laws which indemnify anyone else who ...


1

It may depend on jurisdiction, but as a general rule, one of the elements of committing a crime is intent/mens-rea/guilty mind. If they were attempting to help you and you were not in a state to object, and they did not know your wishes it is unlikely they would be charged with kidnapping - note that part of your definition is "typically to obtain a ransom"...


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