25

TLDR: Install RECAP, use PACER. Beware of costs, which run up quickly. FULL ANSWER PACER is the place to get these documents, but PACER is not free, and the sign up is pretty horrible. If you do sign up, the costs work roughly like this: 10 cents per page for things like PDFs, capped at $3 per document. Search results cost 10 cents per "page" retrieved, ...


9

They would be available on the PACER system. http://pacer.login.uscourts.gov/ You have to sign up to get an account.


7

If you are worried that some secret will become public, you should find and meet with an attorney, not a financial adviser or other nonlawyer. Your attorney is able to shield your secret information from disclosure in ways other professionals cannot. Raise any credit score issues you're concerned about. In general, the public has a right to access judicial ...


6

Your question (when read with your follow-up comments) is somewhat complex, so I am going to make a few assumptions and break it down into several sub parts. Assumptions The conviction occurred in a state where the expungement statute allows you to tell employers that you were never arrested and convicted. When you say “public records websites” you’re ...


5

Short answer: Maybe. Long answer: The answer here varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Normally, the process goes like this: The application for the warrant is usually made under seal or otherwise in secret to prevent the target from trying to hide evidence. So before it's been executed, you can pretty much forget about accessing it. After the warrant ...


4

No, expungement does not give you rights to have the internet purged of your conviction. Public records sites might be interested in updating their records to reflect the expungement, but any media that reported on the incident will probably decline to remove or modify their records. Internet caches will continue to show whatever was available online in ...


3

I'm not sure if you are asking for each of the countries listed, but I am assuming that they are there merely for example. In the US, the are a variety of different rules for its different court systems. As a rule, each State can make its own rules for its court system, and the overarching Federal system has its own rules as well, although they run off of ...


3

There are a variety of reasons a judge might be disqualified. It could be that the judge was previous an attorney who represented someone (defendant, victim, key witness) involved in the case, it could be that the judge was a family member or former employer of the defense attorney, it could be that someone close to the judge or the judge personally was a ...


3

I haven't used the extension, but here are the concerns I would have: Does RECAP detect and handle documents filed under seal? Under some circumstances, IIRC, Pacer gives certain attorneys access to documents sealed from the general public. If you access these sealed documents through PACER and thereby submit them to the RECAP public repository, you have ...


3

One answer is that you should say "yes", because it is a federal felony (5 years prison term) to say "no", because it is untrue, and you know it is untrue. This assumes that the question simply asks "Have you ever been convicted or arrested; please explain", with no qualifiers like "as an adult". If you are absolutely positive that the record was sealed, an ...


3

Verbatim, despite sounding like verbal, only means that it is an exact account of what was said during the proceedings. Thus appending electronic to it means that this exact record is available in some electronic form, like as a Word or PDF document - however they store it electronically. So it is simply stating you can get the verbatim record in either ...


3

Which Supreme Court justices, present or historical, have ruled the most against intellectual property rights? In recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has narrowed the scope of intellectual property rights, overturned more expansive rulings of the Federal Circuit, and overridden Patent and Trademark Office policies consistently. All but two the 26 U.S. ...


3

From what I understand, courts occasionally use "sound" recordings in place of stenographer records. The original recording is not made available to the public but transcripts are. When, where, and why is this done? In Colorado this is done in all limited jurisdiction court proceedings (i.e. the courts where misdemeanors and smaller money claims and ...


2

I run CourtListener.com and RECAP and I hear this question from time to time. It depends a little on what kinds of data you're after. Some folks need court data in real time as it's published by the courts, other folks just want to follow particular cases, etc. I think your options are A commercial provider. Maybe Lexis or Bloomberg? I admit I don't know ...


2

There are three categories of document in a court file (which is likely to be electronic these days); public, private, and other. In England and Wales this is covered in rule 5.4 of the CPR which says that a statement of case (Claim Form, Defence, etc.) or an order or judgement made in open court can be obtained by anyone on payment of the relevant fee (...


2

I'll just add, I'm the director of Free Law Project, and we host a TON of audio files over on CourtListener.com (including SCOTUS ones). They're searchable here: https://www.courtlistener.com/audio/ We also make podcasts if that's your speed: https://www.courtlistener.com/podcasts/


2

united-states In the United States Bob would have a protected right, under the US Federal First Amendment, to discuss his case publicly, give his side of the matter, and speculate on things he does not know for certain. The court can order that particular documents be kept confidential or "under seal". But unless it makes a specific order to this effect, ...


1

You can use a browser add-on to download the audio instead of playing it. I tried Audio Downloader Prime in Firefox but I am sure there are many others that would work. With it installed, you can click the relevant link on the Oyez page under "Media" (e.g. "Oral Argument"), and along with the usual player, you'll see a notification from the add-on in your ...


1

Not necessarily, if there is such a record such as the online listing you described, then I'd imagine a court would consider that as a record of the case. However I doubt a court would accept that a record could be expunged in this case. They would consider the nature of the offence, whether it was a first time offence, and a whole host of other issues and ...


1

You don't say which jurisdiction interests you, so I will explain what I know about - the English High Court, up to a few years ago (changes are afooot, but probably nothing that will have an effect at this level of generality). A tape/digital recording is made of all proceedings unless the judge directs otherwise (he may, for example, direct that a witness'...


1

Are court proceedings ever filmed or otherwise visually recorded? is this type of record ever made available, and if so, when? In the U.S. it varies by court. Even in a same jurisdiction, some counties videotape the hearings and others do not. I used to order a copy of video of my hearings ($20 per case per day) in the county trial court in Michigan. ...


1

is it possible to find public court records of cases they have handled? If so, how? It depends how far each court has gotten in its implementation of information systems for public use. For instance, various trial courthouses in Michigan have a webpage where cases can be searched by attorney's name or bar number. The equivalent in Michigan appellate and ...


1

What legal penalty might apply in a situation where documents were lost by accident before settling or closing an estate? Would there be civil or criminal penalties if, some but not all, documents (like bank statements or property assessments) were accidentally lost? There isn't enough context in this question to know. An executor is a fiduciary who ...


1

Search warrants are ordinarily sealed until they are executed and served, and sometimes longer if the contents of the warrant could prejudice a potential juror or could tip off someone subject to a related search warrant. Once a search warrant ceases to be under seal, it should be on file with the clerk of the court that issued them. This means that some ...


1

In Germany, this is regulated by the individual states (Länder), since the court system is (mostly) organized by the Länder. However, there are some common regulations, for example the Bestimmungen über die Aufbewahrungsfristen für das Schriftgut der ordentlichen Gerichtsbarkeit, der Staatsanwaltschaften und der Justizvollzugsbehörden (Regulations on the ...


1

The Clerk may help but you probably need a case number to find a similar case. The library, preferably a law library or college library. In Florida I start with state statutes and then annotated state statutes and you can find references to cases listed in law reviews. The librarian can help if you have the reference. Cases in other municipalities can help ...


1

The precise procedure will depend on the court, though it will almost certainly be up to the trial judge to decide. However, the principles should be the same wherever you are, and depend on what sort of "error" you are talking about. An obvious typo ("They where going") or mishearing that is clear to the participants though not the transcriber ("dying" for ...


1

It looks like his case is/was in the Washington County TN court system. According to their website, "To check the status of an upcoming Criminal Court case, please contact the clerk at 423-753-1612." I don't see any way to get this information online.


1

If the parallel holds with English courts, then these are indeed court records. The recording itself is not made available to the public, to avoid tampering; but it is possible to have a particular recording transcribed by a court-approved stenographer, and (after approval by the judge, to ensure no egregious errors slipped through and the case was not heard ...


1

It does not appear to me that such a case exists. A good overview of the issues is present at the Wikipedia post on the subject, whose supporting citation links have mostly rotted. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) denied the right of graduate students at private colleges to unionize in 2004 in a case involving Brown University which was reversed by ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible