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6

Per GDPR Art 12(5), “any actions taken under Articles 15 to 22 and 34 shall be provided free of charge”. The right to rectification is Art 16 and reads in its entirety: The data subject shall have the right to obtain from the controller without undue delay the rectification of inaccurate personal data concerning him or her. Taking into account the purposes ...


5

This depends on the context – GDPR rarely restricts the use of specific kinds of data (see Art 9) but instead regulates the processing of this data, and the purposes for which it is processed. Personal data is any information relating to an identifiable person (Art 4(1)). So to show that some information is not personal data, you must show either that it ...


4

Article 4(11) says: ‘consent’ of the data subject means any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject’s wishes by which he or she, by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal data relating to him or her; Recital 32 says (my emphasis): Consent should be given by a ...


3

If you are relying on consent as the legal basis for this processing of personal data, then it MUST be opt-in. Pre-ticked checkboxes are not compliant. If you are relying on a legitimate interest though, then an opt-out solution is OK. What falls under a legitimate interest can be fairly flexible, but you are required to show that this legitimate interest ...


2

The reason for that is that according to GDPR explanation on EU website under GDPR company collecting my personal data and using it for automated decision making should inform me about that and have me agree to it. Only if the basis for processing is consent. The GDPR provides 6 legal basis for data processing - consent is only one of them. If their basis ...


2

Is storing only part(s) of an IP address compliant with the GDPR? Yes. Omitting a portion of the IP address hinders others' ability to identify the natural person who is the data subject. See Article 4 of the GDPR. Would I be allowed to store into database ple, eet 5, Florida? Yes. The aforementioned rationale applies here. The high likelihood that a ...


2

The GDPR applies to all data controllers, regardless of whether the data controller is business or non-profit, corporation or natural person. However, there is an exception for purely personal or household purposes. A CV page comes fairly close to a purely personal purpose, but I don't think this exception would apply: you are not just processing the ...


1

In order to sue someone (successfully, not just waste their time and the court's time), they have to have done a legal wrong. A picture can be taken with consent, and a painting can be made from that picture with consent. A 1 year old child does not have the legal capacity to consent, but a parent does. It only requires the consent of one parent. In the ...


1

Is only a birthday personal identifiable information? It depends, as pointed out by Greendrake. See the definition of "personal data", article 4(1) of the GDPR. I will assume that the scope of your question is not restricted to a small population, and from there you can contrast it with any unspecified particularities you might have in mind. There are ...


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