New answers tagged

3 votes
Accepted

Is it now lawful to exclude people unable to wear face coverings from a public service or venue?

The Equality Act (2010) lists the following protected classes (emphasis mine): age; disability; gender reassignment; marriage and civil partnership; pregnancy and maternity; race; religion or belief; ...
user avatar
-1 votes

Is it now lawful to exclude people unable to wear face coverings from a public service or venue?

Such establishments can’t discriminate on the basis of disability If a person says they are unable to wear a mask, they can’t be discriminated against. Disability is one of the protected features in ...
user avatar
  • 158k
0 votes

LHBTI+ rights and swimwear

In the US, the question only comes up in Arizona and Louisiana. ARS 13-1402(A) says that "A person commits indecent exposure if he or she exposes his or her genitals or anus or she exposes the ...
user avatar
  • 165k
0 votes

LHBTI+ rights and swimwear

new-south-wales Your assumption that males can and females can’t is invalid The law has not been decided. The law on obscene exposure is found in Section 5 of the Summary Offences Act 1988 (NSW), ...
user avatar
  • 158k
1 vote

Would a politically vegan establishment denying entry to one donning pro-carnivore slogans be pursuing proportional means to a legitimate aim?

For the headline question: yes, you can exclude someone if they are behaving in an offensive manner. The restaurant is not the government and has no obligation to allow you to exercise your free ...
user avatar
  • 158k
-2 votes

What is a 'creed' legally?

The NYS constitution, Article 1, Section 11: "No person shall, because of race, color, creed or religion, be subjected to any discrimination in his or her civil rights..." Also "The New ...
user avatar
  • 7
2 votes
Accepted

Is there any lawful reason for a prospective landlord in Scotland to inquire of a potential tenant's nationality?

The official Scottish government website, under the section headed Proof of identity uses the terms "could" and "can" which, in the UK, do not impose a statutory duty or obligation ...
user avatar
  • 23.2k

Top 50 recent answers are included