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The EEOC web site has much information on this topic including summaries of close cases that have been decided in court. To determine whether allowing or continuing to permit an employee to pray, proselytize, or engage in other forms of religiously oriented expression in the workplace would pose an undue hardship, employers should consider the potential ...


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I don't know of any jurisdiction that protects people from discrimination on the basis of body odor, but there are several jurisdictions in the United States with antidiscrimination laws explicitly protecting the homeless. Rhode Island and Illinois, for instance, have each adopted a "Homeless Bill of Rights" establishing the following guarantees: (1) ...


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Anti-discrimination laws apply to certain protected classes only. Homelessness (real or assumed) is not one of them, so it is perfectly legal to bar such people from your premises. It is also perfectly legal to bar people with red hair (assuming this is not indirect discrimination against certain racial groups). Nobody is required to serve everybody who ...


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The Charter applies to EU Member States when they are implementing EU law. If for example there is an EU directive that the member state is to give effect to in domestic law, the member state must take into account the EU Charter when making the new legislation. Outside that, there is no obligation on the member state to act consistently with the EU Charter. ...


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"Explanations relating to the Charter of Fundamental Rights" on the website you linked to is very clear that the Charter of Fundamental Rights only means the EU institutions can't discriminate based on age, and that EU law is not allowed to be age discriminatory. It doesn't mean that individual acts of age discrimination are illegal: In contrast, the ...


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