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3

"Backlogged" has no legal status. Under usual contract terms, all intellectual property you generate as part of your employment belongs to your employer. But "intellectual property" is a category of rights, such as patents, trademarks and copyrights. An idea by itself is not intellectual property. "Wouldn't it be great if ..." cannot be owned by a company. ...


1

The Department of Labor has a page about the law. Some excerpts (boldface mine): Most employees of the federal government are covered by Title II of the Family and Medical Leave Act, which was not amended by this Act, and are therefore not covered by the expanded family and medical leave provisions of the FFCRA. However, federal employees covered by ...


1

Do I have grounds to ask on what grounds? Yes, although the issue of whether "employee has grounds" in and of itself has no relevance from a legal standpoint. For instance, the employee might sense or believe that he is being unjustifiably singled out for drug tests. Thus he has grounds --even if only subjective ones-- to inquire of the employer what ...


-1

I think it is obligatory to have advice of a lawyer: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/8/part/II/crossheading/compromise-agreements “independent legal advice from a qualified lawyer” I had some thoughts about whether to use a firm on the list or someone else. I thought that guys on the list have relationship with the employer and know what is ...


0

It seems the answer is yes, i.e. it is legal. Section 30 of the Australian 1984 Sex Discrimination Act discussing when it is lawful to discriminate based on sex: (g) the occupant of the position is required to enter areas ordinarily used only by persons of the relevant sex while those persons are in a state of undress; or


1

Most anti-discrimination statutes make some allowance for "affirmative action" (though in legal terms it is often called "positive action" or "special measures"), which allows discrimination undertaken for the purpose of acheiving "substantive equality" between relevant classes of people. The rules for "positive action" in recruitment in the UK are set out ...


2

Yes, exactly as DaleM says, a contract can't oblige you to sign another contract. But this gives you no relief. Most employment is consensual. You can be terminated for any reason or no reason at all, except certain protected reasons like religion, race, sexual orientation etc.. Refusing to sign an NDA is not a protected reason. However, the mechanism ...


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An agreement to agree is void There is a multitude of case law on this point. If the NDA was not available to you when you signed the employment contract and the term was couched as you describe; then the term would be unenforcable. That is, your employment contract would be binding except for that term i.e. you could not be compelled to sign the NDA. Now,...


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An employer can be (and usually is) selective in who they offer redundancy to Businesses in this situation act just like Santa Claus; they make a list, check it twice and find out whose been naughty or nice. Unlike Santa they tend to not give these sorts of presents to those on the nice list. They keep the most ‘valuable’ employees. These are not ...


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