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In the UK its somewhat more complex. Much the same principles apply to "unconscionable" contracts, and its a high bar to reach. However for consumers there are distinct rules that apply to terms considered "unfair", and especially in "contracts of adhesion" where one party simply presents a page of fine print and does not permit ...


3

General Principles There is no general prohibition at law for a party with a better negotiating position to negotiate a better deal at the expense of the weaker party - that's just business and business is legal. There is a legal assumption that parties approach contracts as independent, rational actors who, while they may not have equal power, do have the ...


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You're thinking of "unconscionability." In the United States, the general rule is that a contract provision will not be deemed unenforceable for unconscionability unless it is both procedurally and substantively unfair. A provision is considered procedurally unfair if it results from some sort of unfair asymmetry in bargaining positions. This could ...


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Imagine a situation where an employer offers an employee a contract that stipulates that all disputes should be resolved by some arbitration panel in a tax haven. This is likely to be upheld under U.S. law under the Federal Arbitration Act. It isn't an open and shut case, but maybe a 70%-80% chance or more that it would be upheld. Another similar situation ...


3

BC employers are required to give workers three days of unpaid personal illness & injury leave per calendar year. However, this protection only applies to workers who have held a job for more than 90 days. If you have not held the job for that long, it does not appear that any protections apply to you. Note that (as of March 2021) there are separate ...


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The manager can change the schedule if you are run over by a bus. Or if your urgent need for a specialist makes you collapse on the way to work. I suppose you can judge yourself whether the manager can’t change the schedule or if it is a slight inconvenience for him which is more important than your health. Take the matter to HR. Tell them what’s the worst ...


0

Yes Employees must arrive ready to work the hours they are scheduled. You are only entitled to payment for the time you were “ready to work”. If your employer chooses not to use you to do work, that’s up to them.


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