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can they provide me with information that would generally be considered non-confidential but then change their mind and require me to keep it confidential? Generally speaking, no. That is tantamount to amending a readily binding contract, which cannot be done unilaterally. I'm assuming the intermediary (i.e., the staffing agency) changed its mind sometime ...


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"Confidential Information" is whatever the Confidentiality Agreement defines it as If the agreement doesn't define it then what does it mean? A good confidentially agreement will be explicit about what is confidential, at least, it should identify classes of things that are confidential. Client lists can be confidential or not - if you aren't told, ...


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If a contract always uses the wrong name, is it still valid? A contract is not a piece of paper. It is an agreement between parties that meets certain criteria. The piece of paper is just evidence of that agreement that can be referred to should there be any misunderstandings or disputes. So in your case, you would be presumed to have discussed the terms ...


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Does this mean "along with the deposit", "not including the deposit", or is it just meaningless rubbish? (some other parts of the contract have typos and such) It is in your best interest to require the landlord/draftsman to make the contract clear enough instead of signing one that evidently is sloppy. It is quite risky to assume that ...


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Contracts don’t have to be in writing Generally, there are specific exemptions. For example, in some jurisdictions, copyright transfers have to be in writing. Written contracts do not have to take any particular form Again, in general, some specific contracts may need to be in particular forms or explicitly deal with particular matters. Writing doesn’t mean ...


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In general, your intuition is right. When the company goes away, the contract disappears. However, there may be situations in which this intuition misleads, and the confidentiality agreement lives on. Whether it does depends on the details of the dissolution. For example, if someone bought the assets of the company out of bankruptcy, those might include the ...


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I wouldn't rely on a legal remedy. The police likely won't care and I can't imagine a lawsuit being worth it. Are you sure it was malicious? Maybe he just put it in an available bottle to make application easier. The sane thing would probably have been to ask him about it in the first place. For these minor issues you can, in theory, deduct it from money you ...


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All your work is yours. They've made it very clear it wasn't a work for hire, so it's yours. They can't copyright any of their ideas. You can't copyright an idea. Only specific creative elements authored by them and present in your work could be covered by copyright. You didn't use their block diagrams. I don't see how references to other sites to look at ...


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With competent legal advice you might get them to sign a waiver that they relinquish any claim to your work. There may be an argument that you had a verbal/email contract that your relied on (magic words). The list of names might be the only thing that is theirs. On the other hand, I learned many years ago that there is no contract wording between you and ...


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Experience is cheap at any price The web site is not theirs but it’s not clearly yours either because of the sketch design by your not client. Take it down from public view, don’t try to sell it and get on with something new. While legally, you may be within your rights, it seems, given the litigious nature of your “client”, you may have to fight for them in ...


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It depends on the nature of the deposit The deposit can either be: A condition of the contract, or A condition precedent to the contract. If 1., then the contract has been formed and the offer cannot be withdrawn because it has been accepted. The tenderer is clearly in breach and the government can seek damages, likely payment of the deposit and interest ...


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If the party to whom the offer letter is issued fails to take any step towards fulfilling its end, can it be argued that there was no meaningful acceptance as for all intents and purposes, no part of the offer that was 'accepted' has been performed? There was acceptance — the successful bidder communicated its acceptance to the government body and therefore ...


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Yes, you should be paid for May & June By terminating you early, the university has chosen to reduce your notice period and must pay you out for the period you were contractually required to work. How much you should be paid depends on how you are normally paid. For example: if you were a salaried employee paid the same amount every week/fortnight/month;...


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This (Canadian) article gives an overview of reference-letter liability. First, the writer has a duty of care to the subject of the letter. Both false statements and material omissions of true statements can cause harm, and the subject can sue over either. Stating that Smith was janitor when he was a vice president of the firm (in applying for a comparable ...


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does a reference for a candidate employee have liability for what they say about the candidate? To my understanding lying isn't illegal. Lying is unlawful to the extent that the liar's deliberate intent to mislead other(s) causes or is likely to cause unwarranted harm. This is regardless of whether "the person acting as a reference isn't under ...


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In the EU, education is the responsibility of individual Member States, there is no EU-wide law that I can find on the matter. However, Article 165 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union states: The Union shall contribute to the development of quality education by encouraging cooperation between Member States and, if necessary, by supporting ...


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Where you bind to that oral contract if you didn't agree to Y? No, provided that the difference between places X and Y is material. The interlocutor's choice of place Y constitutes a counter-offer. As such, it (1) constitutes a rejection of your original offer, and (2) requires your acceptance for there to be a cognizable agreement. The interlocutor is ...


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I will set aside the problem that as posed, there is no exchange of valuable consideration so there's no contract. I assume the core question is whether silence (and no behavior that resembles acceptance) in the face of a counteroffer constitutes acceptance. The linguistic form is, b.t.w., not a question, it is an exhortation (a sub-type of of declaration). ...


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The four key elements of a contract, which are all required to make it valid, are: agreement, capacity, consideration, and intention. Agreement Agreement is achieved by offer and acceptance. And that is where it already falls flat. Even if you count "Lets meet at 5pm at place X" is an offer, the reply "Lets meet, but not at X but at Y" is ...


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Ron is right. According to 1.18 and 1.50, “Targets” and “Commercial Targets” are not antibodies; they are the molecules targeted by antibodies. BioWa uses these terms as part of the licensing of its core technology. That technology makes antibodies more effective at destroying disease cells. (In their words, it “generates antibodies with enhanced antibody ...


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It's defined in the document under 1.18: 1.18 “Commercial Target” means the Target for which Licensee is granted a Commercial License hereunder. and further on, "Target": 1.50 “Target” means a polypeptide, a carbohydrate chain, or any other molecule to which an Antibody binds or which an Antibody modulates.


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I sign legal documents for real estate companies, most specify blue and some companies you can use black.


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What's a “‘contract of estoppel’”? A contract of estoppel (or by estoppel) is an implied-in-fact or implicit contract in which the acts of the parties forfeit the liable party's denial of that contract. Said acts embody the objective agreement, whereas the subsequent allegations as to their intention thereof are of a subjective nature. A party might ...


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Contractors don't have employers; they have principals You say you're a contractor, if so: Can you employ someone else to do the work on your behalf? Are you paid for what you produce and not on the hours you work? Do you provide your own tools and equipment? Do you run a commercial risk; that is, can you make a profit or loss on this contract? Do you ...


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According to your description, you have a contract to work 200 hours, and this must be accomplished between May 12 and July 10. Apparently you are 25 hour short on that obligation, which may mean that you probably will be in breach of contract. I don't see what error there is w.r.t. the date: whatever the contract says, that is what you agreed to. Perhaps ...


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I know what estoppel means. I just don't understand why the Taylors below and Mr Hume Williams can use "estoppel" in this case, Scrivens, because Hindley & Co. never promised or undertook anything? Estoppel was used as a defence in this case. The defendant hoped to use the intention of the buyer and for a part the seller, in determining what ...


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