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1

Paragraph (a) is the stuff that applies generally, where paragraph (c) would append or modify (a). ORS 90.300(7)(c) seems to append carpet cleaning to the items covered in ORS 90.300(7)(a). So it appears they can charge for carpet cleaning regardless if its 'ordinary wear and tear' or not as long as the conditions 90.300(7)(c)(A) i - iii are met.


35

A person's contractual rights and obligations remain valid past their death, so if the landlord dies, their heirs cannot then kick out the tenant, and likewise if the tenant dies, their estate still is liable for unpaid past and future rent. That means for example that the person cannot be evicted, the landlord cannot take their property or enter without ...


24

Yes. Your grandmother's estate is responsible for the rent. In fact, your grandmother's estate is entitled to continue renting the apartment for a reasonable amount of time as is needed to wrap up the affairs of the estate. Those affairs, at the very least, include gathering possessions and papers, arranging appropriate off site storage, and transporting ...


3

When a court is required to decide whether someone is professionally “qualified” or “competent,” it will generally consider the opinion of expert witnesses from that profession. For example, in Stothers (M & E) Ltd v Leeway Stothers Ltd [2011] NIQB 35, a building contractor claimed that an electrical contractor had breached a contract requiring work to ...


2

A person who does either of the bullet points is “qualified and competent” At least as far as the landlord is concerned. The electrician could be a plumber who’s lying through their teeth but so long as the landlord doesn’t know this and has no reason for suspecting it, the landlord has complied with the requirements.


1

Under what conditions is the landlord entitled to deduct the difference in taxes from the security deposit? These would have to be specified in the contract as in the tax escalation clause in Gateway Center Corp. v. U.S., 766 F.2d 494 (1985) and in terms that supersede "the usual meaning" [and purpose] of the term as outlined in Bowles v. ...


2

An increase in occupancy tax would only be recoverable from the security deposit if the charge is authorized under the lease. The excerpt of the lease provided is not clear enough to determine if that is the case. There is also an argument that the Security Deposit does not cover unpaid rent or occupancy tax, although that would probably not be the strongest ...


-1

You have a reasonable case factually that the landlord is not entitled to make this charge, which would be a disputed factual issue if it were contested in litigation. And, being the U.K., if you prevailed, you would also get your litigation costs including attorney fees, if you prevailed. This said, the amount of money at stake is very low to justify ...


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