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1

The landlord cannot “fine” a tenant Only governments can impose penalties. If the city fines the landlord, that is the landlord’s fine and they can’t make anyone else pay it. If the landlord believes that someone else committed the offence and they didn’t, then they should go to court and prove their innocence. Of course, they may still be liable for the ...


0

Am I entitled to an application refund due to the amount of discrepancies caused on their part and the false report by their screen company? Short answer No. Long answer The question doesn't seem to indicate that there is a false report by the screening company. It said you didn't have a rental history, but the question doesn't indicate that you do have a ...


4

Sam Wilson: Found a place in Brookyln yet? Steve Rogers/Captain America: I don't think I can afford a place in Brooklyn. NYC is a very in-demand market, with many apartment-seekers being out-of-state dreamers, or local residents who have realistically been priced out of their own town by gentrification. This demand overloads landlords - ties up a lot of ...


17

Debt factoring is common practice Fees generally range about 1-2% higher than mortgage rates depending on how prevalent bad debts are in the industry. This means I can get what you’re selling for less than a quarter of your price. Typical arrangements are that I get 80% when the debt falls due and the balance (less your fee of say 3%) when the debtor pays. ...


2

It’s agents all the way down I can appoint an agent. That agent can appoint an agent who will also be my agent. Repeat step 2 as often as necessary. Of course, an agency agreement can prohibit sub-agency but the details of that will generally not be publicly known. Which is the reason that agency law includes the concept of apparent authority which means ...


16

It is not uncommon for a landlord to instruct tenants to make payments via a lockbox service to an address other than the landlord's business office address. It is also not uncommon for a landlord to hire a management company that collects all rent and also handles maintenance and other on-premises services. Such services, I understand, charge rather less ...


23

The tenant wouldn't be involved in this at all. The tenant rents from the landlord, and the landlord gives them an account number where the tenant sends the money every month. How would the tenant be involved with you? Actually, if I was the tenant and I was told to pay the rent to some third party, that would be the reddest of all red flags to me. As a ...


37

Yes Businesses (and consumers) can choose who to do business with and what information they ask for and disclose and when they do that. If you’re uncomfortable with how they do business, don’t deal with them. If they don’t like how you do business, they are free not to deal with you. This is called discrimination. However, it is not unlawful because only ...


3

In general, a person may appoint as many agents as s/he wishes for a particular purpose. The principal is responsible for the actions of all such agents, unless they exceeded their powers or instructions, and in some cases even then. In this particular case all such accesses would have to be "reasonable" taken together, and if the various agents ...


3

Can a landlord keep a security deposit if my apartment rental application is approved, but I back out of signing the lease? That can't be legal, right? No. That is a violation of California CIV 1950.5. Although 1950.5(b) reflects that one of the permissible purposes of a security deposit is "to reimburse the landlord for costs associated with ...


2

Overview In California a landlord owes a limited duty to tenants to maintain safety and security. The landlord must take reasonable steps against reasonably foreseeable dangers, including from crime. The exact steps required will depend on the specific circumstances, but will require provision of deadbolt locks at a minimum. None of the sources I found dealt ...


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