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0

No. For example, in Washington, notice must either be given in person, or by both posting "in a conspicuous place on the premises unlawfully held" as well as "deposited in the mail, postage prepaid, by both regular mail and certified mail directed to the tenant's or tenants' last known address". As far as I know, no notice to tenant can ...


3

The old terms apply ... ... until the landlord gives notice and ends the lease - then the tenant has to get out. This is not inconsistent with the requirement to “execute all revised rental agreements upon request” - unless and until new terms have been agreed, there are no “revised rental agreements”, once there are, the tenant can be requested to (and must)...


1

after the expiration ... Prior to the lease expiring Those are the key words. Once lease has expired the parties are all even. Noone owes anything to anyone (assuming all rent has been paid and there are no claims). Tenant can either sign a new lease on whatever terms can be agreed, or go. The wording "the resident agrees to execute all revised rental ...


6

A limitation has to be expressed in lease and must not violate laws related to housing discrimination that apply to the place where the leased property is located. There are also other terms of a lease that are statutorily prohibited or prohibited at common law (e.g. imposition of a penalty interest rate in excess of the rate allowed by usury laws). But, the ...


1

§88 gives an exhaustive list of legal ways to deliver the written notice. Each and every one of them involves delivery of a physical piece of paper, including fax transmission to a number provided by a recipient. Apart from direct hand-over, ordinary mail is acceptable so registered mail is not required. Email and phone-based messaging do not constitute ...


1

Rental contracts with more than one tenant are usually written in a way that the tenants are "Gesamtschuldner" (joint debtors). That means the landlord can request any contractual obligations from any one of the tenants at their discretion. So if one contract partner is deceased, then the landlord can demand that the remaining tenant fulfills any ...


2

In Germany, the assets and liabilities of the deceased (including, I think, contractual rights and obligations) pass immediately to the heirs - there is no probate or deceased estate as there is in common law jurisdictions. In your circumstances, the rights and obligations of B pass immediately to C. Therefore, A & C are required to do whatever it is ...


-5

It's the landlord's house. If he wants to install an outward pointing camera that's his right.


-2

You appear to have been asked to install a mains-powered device on the outside of the building. Are you a qualified electrician? If not, don't get involved with the installation. (That includes the buying of the camera.) If this is a bona-fide rental then you will have some sort of written agreement with a lettings agent who holds your deposit and collects ...


-2

My landlord has asked that we do not delete the footage when we leave the property, as they want to "re-run it". What happens if you delete it anyway? Would they have any recourse against you? They may be annoyed or not, but probably wont be able to follow it up (if you don't sign this in writing).


4

Presumably you are not being asked to sign a replacement tenancy agreement in which you have the obligation to hand over the data when you leave the property. Rather it sounds like an informal request on the part of the landlord. Such a request is unenforceable. In order for it to be legally binding, there would need to be a contract (whether oral or written)...


10

Adding to Paul's answer, you have considerable protections under GDPR here, and there's a host of angles you can use to get your data removed, or have it not collected in the first place. Your landlord, even as a sole trader, is required to register and pay a fee to do this to the ICO (1), and can be fined up to £4000 if he fails to do so. You have the right ...


48

This article basically says "it depends": If it is genuinely used to improve tenant safety then that is OK, but if it is used to track your private life then that is not acceptable. Cameras that cover communal areas used by several properties are generally acceptable, but cameras covering individual properties are much less so. It sounds like ...


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