97

Trespassing requires that you be on someone else's property without their permission. The supervisor has explicitly given you permission, so it's not possible for you to trespass. You are correct that someone with the proper authority could revoke this permission at any time, at which point you would have to leave or be guilty of trespassing. The only way ...


65

Maybe, Hence the Lawsuits In the absence of clear statute law these all circle around tort law. For the scooter companies, trespass to chattels, and for the affected landowners (who hire the removalists) trespass to land and nuisance seem applicable. In essence, I can’t take your stuff (trespass to chattels) but you can’t leave your stuff on my property (...


35

...a disgruntled customer walks into the employee only area and refuses to leave until xyz demands are met. That is called trespassing. Trespass is defined by the act of knowingly entering another person’s property without permission. Trespass | Wex Legal Dictionary | Legal Information Institute The boundary between areas legally accessible by the ...


35

So, in England and Wales your son assaulted Mario. (From Wikipedia: "Assault is committed if one intentionally or recklessly causes another person to apprehend immediate and unlawful personal violence". I expect Mario expected your son was going to thump him, and that would certainly be unlawful.) You were both trespassers on the property; however it sounds ...


34

What is the legality of someone putting a virtual hot spot on your property without permission? I know we are in uncharted territory but how would this compare to setting up a contest that would require going on your property without permission? The existence of a game does not authorise entrance to private property, barring some agreement with the owner. ...


29

It depends. If you child is actually a child, then if someone refuses to return your child to you upon your request, you are arguably acting to prevent a crime, which gives you some leniency in terms of use of force. Also makes it less likely you’ll be charged even if you technically broke a law in the process. You are not going to court if you walk into ...


23

Your rights notwithstanding, the government has the power to do such things under appropriate circumstances. First, you would have to be in violation of some ordinance, for instance in Columbus OH you are a violator if the grass is over 12". This should generate a notice informing you what the issue is and giving a deadline for remedy. If you don't comply by ...


18

My general belief is that in the United States entering structures like the ones you've pictured would be considered trespassing regardless of if there is a sign in place or not. This is based on the fact that I'm almost certain that if you become injured while on the premises you could sue the land owner. I believe the trespassing signs are just there to ...


16

In the UK, trespass (except in places like nuclear plants and railway lines) is a civil offence not a criminal offence, and so you can only be sued for compensation for any costs the landowner incurred as a result of your trespass, and you can't get a criminal record.


15

Most jurisdictions define trespassing as being immediately trespassing if you are somewhere you have been previously warned away from (kicked out of the mall) or where there are signs posted denying permission to enter certain places where it's obvious, such as a private home certain places defined by law as not needing signs because signage would be ...


15

if a postal police officer happened to be there one day, he'd [...] question the supervisor I'd say the post office people, and esp. the supervisor, are at much higher risk than you. If, by some policy or law or whatever, what you do was actually prohibited, then the supervisor and staff would likely get into trouble for allowing you there because it ...


13

You clearly committed trespass and assault; other charges such as burglary and threatening behaviour are possible, depending on the view of the authorities. It would be possible for your defence lawyer to argue that you were acting to prevent a crime, and if the court accepted the argument you would be acquitted. However, it is not a crime for Mario to ...


10

In many countries (for instance, the US), churches and mosques are private property. In general, the owner of private property can throw anyone off their property; claiming you're doing an extensive period of praying doesn't matter, because they are under no obligation to let people stay as long as needed to pray (they can kick someone off the property for ...


8

I would serve the parents (certified mail), with a "cease and desist" letter, telling them that the children are repeatedly trespassing on your property and that you want them to stop; even get the police involved if you have to. I know it sounds harsh, but you said New England; that's where I live and I know the trespass laws are not in your favor ... ...


8

For the most part, if you don't do any damage to the property, or yourself, and don't get caught, then I don't think you've anything to worry about. As others have mentioned, liability is a property owners primary concern when it comes to vacant, condemned, or abandoned properties. Even if they don't get sued, if someone breaks their neck parkouring on a ...


8

I think you would have difficulty distorting the situation - Pokemon Go is not magic that defies existing laws, and this would be no different to a mall issuing a trespass notice (which is effectively how they would kick you out) for any other reason. I would question the ability of a store to "Arrest" you - that is a job for the police - After they ...


8

You did not specify your country of origin, but in England there is actually no law against simply "trespassing". However, the fact that your son has broken into private property and then threatened Mr. Mario, he would be vulnerable to charges related to Aggravated Trespass under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. If he physically assaulted Mr. ...


8

The New Hampshire law against trespassing says I. A person is guilty of criminal trespass if, knowing that he is not licensed or privileged to do so, he enters or remains in any place. State law does not specify what conditions constitute having license or privilege. The Franklin city code specifies one form of privilege. A:The Fire Chief or his or ...


8

Is there a way for us to prevent the sale of the house until they have moved the fence? For example, it seems that filing suit against the current owners doesn't necessarily prevent the sale, and that the suit would be pointless after the sale is complete. You can't prevent the sale, but if you file suit to adjudicate the boundary dispute and file ...


7

None of this discussion about the signs amounts to anything, really. All of these questions will vary by jurisdiction, but typically, you can stand anywhere in any privately-owned store and be asked to leave and refusing to do so would be considered trespassing. The existence or not of a sign is irrelevant to a trespassing case. The sign exists to notify ...


6

In the U.S. (42 U.S. Code § 2000): proprietors of "public accommodations," which include retail establishments like shopping malls, cannot discriminate on the basis of "race, color, religion, or national origin." Some states add additional protected classes. So, suppose you satisfy a court that playing Pokemon Go is the exercise of your religion. In that ...


6

I don't know anything about Filipino law. I just looked up the law in Michigan in the United States. First, under Michigan law, it doesn't sound like you are guilty of "trespassing". Trespassing in Michigan is when you enter someone else's property after they have told you that you are not permitted, or if you refuse to leave when ordered. In practice, ...


5

"Public space" is not a relevant criteria when considering trespass or other crimes/torts against property. The relevant criteria is who owns it and what they allow you to do on it. All land in the USA is owned by someone. That someone may be a government; that does not make it a public space - Camp David is owned by the US government; it is certainly not ...


5

Purchasing a lot that contained the keys does not provide any rights to access the locks that those keys would open. What someone who did this would be charged with would vary by both location and also by prosecutorial discretion. The only exception in this scenario would be if the storage locker contained the deed to the property in question.


5

Depending on the bridge, you might be trespassing in some way. Railway bridges are the property of the railway company, they don't allow to go there unless specifically allowed and even the absence of a sign is not an ok in those cases. Similarly, highway bridges usually are communal property and they don't need to be marked as off limits if there are laws ...


5

This depends on the nature of the "ban" ---i.e., who issued it, what legal power they have, and what it actually requires you to refrain from doing. You say it is "their ban" so I am going to assume that this is just a decision that the store has made not to allow you entry. If it is indeed the store itself that has "banned" you, this would not prevent you ...


4

The question for trespassing is whether the trespasser has been adequately notified of the possession interest that another person has in the property. Although it is legal to evangelize door-to-door without a permit, most jurisdictions will require you to leave promptly if the owner asks you to leave. In the absence of such verbal requests, you have a ...


4

You were most likely committing trespass (you were not invited onto the property, and it is implied in your post based on your method of entering you did not have a claim to be there) Additionally you were almost certainly "breaking and entering". A more appropriate response would have been to get a law enforcement officer to intervene.


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