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Wednesbury unreasonableness has two aspects Lord Greene MR identified two types of unreasonableness: a decision that took into account irrelevant considerations or did not take into account relevant considerations; and where a discretionary decision was "so unreasonable that no reasonable authority could ever have come to it" – and that required ...


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This refers to the second limb; it is not for the court to interfere with the decision unless it is totally and utterly unreasonable. For example, it's perfectly possible that given the exact same set of circumstances and conditions, two different public bodies may make different - and yet reasonable - decisions. This is how the Master of the Rolls put it in ...


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"The merits of the decision" or "of the case" means a decision based on the actual facts and circumstances of the particular case, not on a general legal principle. For example if a decision was made in bad faith, or if it was so absurd that no reasonable body would have made it, one need not go into the details of the case to know that ...


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